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The Politics of Healthcare

Is Gun Violence a Public Health Issue?

Published January 18, 2013 10:58 AM by Kelly Wolfgang
As reported on Newswise, the following is a statement by Jo Ivey Boufford, MD, president of The New York Academy of Medicine, one of the nation's oldest and most prestigious medical academies, on the seriousness of gun violence as a major public health issue. The statement is in response to deadly incidents of gun violence in Newtown, CT, Webster, NY, and the shooting of 15 individuals, three of whom died, during separate acts of gun violence in Chicago, IL on New Year's Day.

"As a nation, we can only improve the health of the public when we get our priorities straight. Recent acts of gun violence in Chicago, Webster, NY, and Newtown, CT cannot be ignored. Neither can the 31,000 Americans who die each year at the hands of a gun. This number exceeds the number of babies who die each year during their first year of life (25,000) or people who die from AIDS (9,500) or illicit drugs (17,000).

We institute protective measures enforcing speed limits and requiring the use of safety belts; we implement public health measures such as child vaccinations and regulations around the safety of food, drugs, and products. Yet guns escape this type of regulation despite their significant contribution to the mortality rate each year. We must view gun violence as a serious threat to the public's health if we want to reduce the number of deaths associated with guns.

We can start by banning the sale of assault rifles, high-capacity magazines, and other facilitators of mass murder. And we must allow government agencies like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to fully exercise their duties in both surveillance of the incidence and impact of gun violence, and in educating the public on steps for preventing death and injury through the use of firearms.

The evidence is clear, and we must now take action to protect our neighbors and ourselves from this devastating public health crisis."

In December, both the American Nurses Association and the American College of Emergency Physicians, two prominent and national healthcare organizations, issued calls for a ban on the sale of assault weapons.

Sister publication ADVANCE for Nurse Practitioners & Physician Assistants asked its readers, "Do you think it is the responsibility of healthcare provider organizations to urge this type of action?"

Here's what some readers had to say:

  • "We can all do our part. As nurses, as humans." - Teanne
  • "Just stand in a trauma unit for one night and come back and give me your answer." - Melissa
  • "Yes! Absolutely! It's everyone's responsibility to speak up for what they believe!" - Kelli
  • "Absolutely not. I have stood in the trauma unit for 15 years and taking away my legal guns, which I carry concealed because I am licensed to do so, and taking away my rifles, which I enjoy shooting responsibly, will do nothing to stop the common street thug with an illegal weapon, other than allow me no protection for myself and my property when I'm leaving the trauma unit at midnight, sitting at a red light, and getting jacked by said thug." - Dana
  • "Most of our ER staff is armed; we see what's out there. As the Boy Scouts say, be prepared. The bad guys will always find guns; we need to be able to defend ourselves." - Diana
  • "Absolutely. Some individuals have no business having weapons. Period." - Teresa
  • "This is definitely not the responsibility of healthcare provider organizations. This is a civil liberty. I'm sure many members of the groups do not support a ban. These groups should focus on healthcare issues." - Rita
  • "Supporting mental illness awareness and research would be a wiser choice! Let's be honest, what health professional has not taken some form of weapon to work with them?" - Susan

Do you agree with Boufford's statement and the calls for action by the American Nurses Association and the American College of Emergency Physicians? Weigh in on the comments below.

Editor's note: We welcome your comments and topic suggestions; contact blog author Kelly Wolfgang at kwolfgang@advanceweb.com.

1 comments

Responsible gun owners are not the issue.  We never saw this level of violence when there was adequate mental health coverage in place.  THAT is the issue.  Get people their mental health issues taken care of and all the illegal gun usage will decrease.  These recent massacres are all related to mental issues and illegally obtained guns. We also should not give them notoriety which only encourages others.

Dory, Lab - Lab Admin Director, Gift of life May 13, 2013 9:58 AM
Ann Arbor MI

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