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Stepwise Success

Are You A High Performer?

Published May 28, 2014 6:09 AM by Scott Warner

“He’s a talker,” a colleague once described one of his employees to me. “I’m lucky if I can get five hours a day out of him.” Time is money, and any time spent wasted while at work is a productivity hit. Forbes reports that most employees surf the Web at work, for example, wasting time on Facebook, LinkedIn, Amazon, Twitter, or Pinterest:

Respondents said the No. 1 reason for slacking at work was that they don’t feel challenged enough in their job. Other reasons include, (2) they work too many hours, (3) the company doesn’t give sufficient incentive to work harder, (4) they are unsatisfied with their career, and (5) they’re just bored.

Yet there are those people who hit the ground running and work at a high level throughout their day. These people are self-directed, enthusiastic, autonomous high performers who can be depended on day in, day out. They concentrate on improving their skills, innovate new solutions, and continuously improve quality. As one website adds, they also have strong people skills and larger networks.

High performers in your lab are those who don’t grumble when asked to help with outpatient draws, who don’t flinch at handling unpopular specimens, who are the first to volunteer when there is a schedule problem, and who are always willing to help, even if it’s only to listen. High performers are constantly focused on the best for the patient, unlikely to be distracted by petty politics, and constantly learning. They see failure as a challenge to do better, so they expect to fail once in a while.

Any organization is deluding itself if it believes it can hire or retain only high performers. These individuals are few and far between. They lead, inspire, and motivate coworkers with their love for medical technology. They have a unique ability to elevate a workplace from competent to good or even great. I can’t imagine what a workplace filled with high performers would be like, but I don’t think I’ll ever see it.

Does your lab have high performers? Are you a high performer?

NEXT: A Better Blood Bank History

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About this Blog


    Scott Warner, MLT(ASCP)
    Occupation: Laboratory Manager
    Setting: Critical Access Hospital
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