Close Server: KOPWWW05 | Not logged in


Welcome to Health Care POV | sign in | join
Career Coach

Re-evaluating the ‘Dream Job’

Published August 8, 2016 8:55 AM by Renee Dahring
What's the first thing that comes in to your mind when I say the words "dream job?" I would venture to say your initial thoughts will go in the direction of pay, hours or perhaps location. If I gave you a few minutes more to ponder, you would likely add some other elements such as the patient population you will be serving, the number of patients you have to see per day and perhaps no call duties.

Now this is where it gets interesting. You may be surprised to learn many NPs who contact me looking for a different position tell me they currently have all or most of that list. If you are an NP who is not happy with your current job, you aren't likely to cite any of the above as reasons for your displeasure and desire for a new job. Instead, you will assure me you actually are making very good money and the hours might not be great, but you don't mind. Your benefits package is generous; in fact, that is part of the reason you have stayed as long as you have in this position. And yes, you really do love your patients. What you will tell me is that you no longer have a job that you can look forward to going to every day.

So what then is the problem? Pay, benefits, great patients-what more could you want?

Well, let's start with a happy work environment. Unhappy clinicians tell me they want to find a workplace that has both a great boss and co-workers. They want respect, good communication and to be valued for their contributions. They don't want to be miserable every day, dealing with unreasonable bosses, gossiping co-workers and increasing paperwork demands.

For unhappy clinicians the characteristics that define a dream job have undergone a major revision. Pay and benefits aren't at the top of the wish list anymore and have been replaced by requirements that really can't be written into an employment contract. What they want now are the intangibles.

My advice if you are in this situation and seeking a new job is that you take your time and pay attention to your intuition. I guarantee there were probably some warning signs that you either missed or even ignored.

As a former recruiter, I learned a few tricks to spotting a troubled workplace.

Stay tuned, I will share them with you in my next blog.

1 comments

No one wants their dream job to turn into a nightmare. My recruiting days were spent listening to NPs

August 22, 2016 8:40 AM

leave a comment



To prevent comment spam, please type the code you see below into the code field before submitting your comment. If you cannot read the numbers in the image, reload the page to generate a new one.

Captcha
Enter the security code below:
 

Search

About this Blog



    Occupation: Nurse Practitioners and NP Recruiters
    Setting: correctional healthcare/career consulting/teaching
  • About Blog and Author

Keep Me Updated

Archives