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DNP Answers

Feedback on the DNP
December 7, 2012 9:19 AM by Mai Kung

Q: What are your feelings on the DNP? Is the degree really worth it?

A: The DNP movement has gained wide acceptance. The numbers of DNP programs, enrollees, and graduates have increased exponentially over the last ten years. There were 20 DNP programs in 2006, and in 2011 there were 182 programs in operation, with another 101 programs in the planning stages. The number of enrollees and graduates also grew from 862 persons enrolled in 2006 to 8973 in 2011; and the number of graduates increased from 74 in 2006 to 1581 in 2011. 

Over the same period, PhD programs grew, but at a slower pace. There were 103 programs in 2006 and 126 in 2011. 3927 PhD students enrolled in 2006, compared to 4907 in 2011. Such programs graduated a total of 601 students with a PhD degree in 2011.

Initially, there was ambiguity about the purpose of the DNP degree (that it was designed for clinical roles only), a perception shared even by nurse educators. However, as the DNP movement evolved and is overwhelmingly adopted, the DNP degree is transforming not only how nurses are educated to take on advanced practice clinical roles, but also to prepare nurses as administrators, educators, and leaders. 

As per the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF, 2005), "DNP programs prepare leaders who will improve the quality of care, patient outcomes, and health policy that expands their impact on the health of society," (page 1, para. 3.  Available at http://www.nonpf.com/associations/10789/files/DNP-NPCurricTemplates0907.pdf).

Editor's note: At the DNP Answers blog, nurse practitioners with a DNP answer your questions about the degree. This question is answered by blogger Mai Kung, NP, DNP. Comment below to discuss this topic, or send new questions to kwolfgang@advanceweb.com.

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DNPs in Administration
November 30, 2012 2:51 PM by Mai Kung

Q: From the Administrative Advanced Practice role and the DNP's perspective, I would be interested to know how many of you fall into this category and what kind of feedback you have been receiving related to the DNP degree versus a PhD or EdD. From my fairly limited current informal survey, many are viewing the degree as belonging solely to the directly clinical advanced practice role.

 A: The Doctor of Education (EdD) can be a research or a practice-oriented degree in education that prepares students for clinical, administrative, academic or research positions. A Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree is focused on research and a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree is an academic degree that is focused on practice in Nursing. 

DNP programs also prepare nurses for clinical, administrative, and academic roles.  Nurses who are interested in advanced clinical practice can choose to become a nurse practitioner, nurse anesthetist, nurse midwife or a clinical nurse specialist. Those who are interested in leadership and administrative roles can choose to concentrate in health system leadership, administration or health policy. Those who are interested in academia may choose nursing education as an area of focus. 

Dr. David O'Dell, DNP, a Founder and Director of the DNP LLC, Inc., presented at the 5th DNP Conference in September on "The State of the DNP Degree:  Analysis of Three Years of National Survey Data."  According to these national survey data, between 25 and 35 percent of the respondents named Leadership or Policy as their DNP program concentration.  This presentation is available at:  http://www.doctorsofnursingpractice.org/DNPConfArchives.htm.

At this meeting, I also had the pleasure of meeting Dr. Launette Woolforde, an RN with a DNP degree.  She is corporate director for nursing education at the North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System. She works alongside other health systems leaders and oversees related activities for 15 hospitals and over 12,000 nurses. Dr. Woolforde feels the DNP degree has helped prepare her for administrative and leadership roles to improve healthcare quality and safety. 

 

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The DNP in the ED
November 9, 2012 1:13 PM by Meg Carman

Q: Please describe the DNP role in your NP specialty.

A: I will step up on my DNP soapbox once again to say that completing your DNP serves to open up a new way of thinking, a way to approach your practice. It is not an avenue for developing a new position or making more money.

The DNP provides you with the tools and resources to understand how to find and evaluate the evidence for best practice, to look at your own practice setting, and to develop the skills to bring best practice to your environment. It allows you to grow!

The DNP helps you to take all those problems in the system that leave you with a burning feeling in the pit of your stomach, and figure out how to bring about solutions. It helps to alleviate those situations when you’ve looked at a great new idea in the literature and tried it out, but you are left scratching your head and saying, ”Why didn’t that work?”

Most DNP programs include courses on graduate level statistics, translation of evidence, leadership, and advocacy in the advanced practice role. The capstone is completed at the culmination of many programs, which allows students to incorporate their learning into one project of meaning in their current practice.

In my emergency department practice, I use my DNP knowledge to prompt me to develop a clinical question- how we might change processes, or if we are delivering best practice. Is there a guideline that could be applied to a subpopulation within our department?

My current interest lies in differentiating patients who come to the ED because their chronic pain is inadequately managed. These patients may be on a pain contract, or they may be “doctor shopping” to get relief. We often stigmatize them or categorize them as “drug seekers,” while they are experiencing true pain in a system that is not addressing the problem adequately.

How do we assess patients presenting for chronic pain in the ED? How do we differentiate them from persons seeking opioid therapy for diversion or addiction? Are there tools that we can use to accomplish this? And are they appropriate in this population? How can we think outside of the box, other than providing a Motrin and a Percocet, to address their needs within the ED setting? I’ll let you know when I get my answers.

Editor's note: The DNP Answers blog addresses your questions about the DNP. This post is contributed by blogger Meg Carman, DNP, ACNP-BC, CEN, who serves on faculty in the ABSN program at the Duke University School of Nursing in Durham, N.C. She also practices with Wake Emergency Physicians in Raleigh. Comment below to discuss this topic, or send new questions to kwolfgang@advanceweb.com.

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DNP Faculty
October 26, 2012 11:53 AM by Lisa Chism, NP

Q: How can the DNP faculty member improve nursing education?

A: A faculty member prepared as a Doctor of Nursing Practice may improve nursing education through his or her understanding of nursing practice. Although many faculty appointments now recommend or require faculty to maintain a clinical practice, the DNP degree emphasizes a set of skills beyond that of direct patient care. The skills learned in a DNP degree are specifically aimed at improving nursing practice directly or indirectly through the understanding and implementation of evidence-based practice, leadership, health policy and information technology. Additionally, a faculty member with a practice doctorate may be able to translate the use of nursing theory and science in practice through their own experiences and interpretations. Although nursing educators with PhDs are essential for the development of our discipline, faculty members with DNPs also add a rich component for students due to their ability to translate and implement our body of knowledge into practice.

Editor's note: At the DNP Answers blog we take your questions about the DNP and answer them as best we can. This post is written by blogger Lisa Chism, NP, DNP, NCMP. Lisa was selected as the 2011 North American Menopause Society Certified Menopause Provider of the Year. Comment below to discuss this topic, or send new questions to kwolfgang@advanceweb.com.

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Selecting a DNP Capstone Project
October 19, 2012 9:09 AM by Catherine Nichols

Q: I am applying to DNP programs and one of the programs asked to state a topic of interest for the DNP capstone project if one was to be admitted. I was wondering if this is a good capstone project topic? Is it too broad? Does it encompass what a capstone entails? "I am currently in the process of becoming an active duty Air Force nurse. If I were to be accepted into your program, my interest for the capstone project would be centered on military healthcare professionals, particularly nurses with PTSD, and what policies can be implemented so that this condition does not negatively affect patient care." 

A: Determining a topic of interest for the DNP scholarly project is one that needs consideration on a multitude of levels. First and foremost, it is the culmination of your education and clinical experiences. It is your expression of nursing interest, passion, education and leadership as a DNP student (Conway-Welch, 2010). The capstone project is a venue to contribute to the body of nursing knowledge, using your skills as a nurse and researcher to carry on the pioneering spirit of the DNP.

Choosing a topic is very subjective and is based on individual interest and experience. Discussing the topic with either your adviser or committee will help guide you through this process. Some questions to keep in mind when selecting a “phenomenon of interest” are; a) Is the topic relevant to the current healthcare climate, b) Is it researchable, c) Is the research question novel, d) Is it relevant to my present or future clinical practice?

Wright State University of Ohio has compiled thorough directives for the capstone project in their DNP program handbook, 2012-2013 (see link below). In it, the authors have created the following list to assist in choosing a capstone project:

  1. The project relates to your advanced practice specialty.
  2. The project is evidence based.
  3. The project focuses on identified need(s) of a group, population or community rather than an individual person.
  4. The project may be done in partnership with agencies or other groups.
  5. The project leadership may be solo or collaborative depending on the scope of the project.
  6. A thorough, systematic and replicable approach is used for design, implementation, and evaluation of the project outcomes.
  7. The project meets accepted professional standards.
  8. Opportunities are available for dissemination at professional and public forums that meet your time/financial constraints (2012).

There are a number of universities, websites, and current literature that can assist in your selection of a topic. The key principle to keep in mind is your particular interest, experience, and development need of the phenomenon. This is going to be your contribution to the nursing discipline and healthcare system. Make the selection that will generate a difference in health care related outcomes (2012).

References

  1. Conway-Welch, C. (2010). Doctor of Nursing Practice Scholarly Projects, 2010. Retrieved from http://www.nursing.vanderbilt.edu/dnp/pdf/dnp_scholarlprojects_2010.pdf
  2. Wright State University College of Nursing and Health and the University of Toledo College of Nursing (2012). Doctor of Nursing Practice Program Handbook 2012-2013. Retrieved from nursing.wright.edu/sites/default/files/.../DNP-handbook-083112.pdf

Editor's note: At the DNP Answers blog, nurse practitioners with a DNP answer your questions about the degree. This question is answered by blogger Catherine Nichols, MSN, ANP-BC, a DNP student and adult nurse practitioner. Comment below to discuss this topic, or send new questions to kwolfgang@advanceweb.com.

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Executive NP Track
October 12, 2012 9:29 AM by Lisa Chism, NP

Q: In my DNP research I've seen mention of an "executive NP" track. How would a DNP program prepare an NP to become an executive NP? What kinds of roles would that NP fill?

A: Great question. A DNP track that focuses on an "executive track" would have a strong focus on leadership and health systems management. Coursework will include appropriate work reflective of the DNP Essentials but also focus on developing leadership skills and systems management (marketing, finance, organizational leadership). This type of program would help you to develop the skill necessary for organizational leadership and to fill roles such as program director, systems specialist, or executive leadership such as CNO, or VP of patient services. These programs augment your work experience and give you the additional skills to be a leader on an organizational level.  

Editor's note: At the DNP Answers blog we take your questions about the DNP and answer them as best we can. This post is written by blogger Lisa Chism, NP, DNP, NCMP. Lisa was selected as the 2011 North American Menopause Society Certified Menopause Provider of the Year. Comment below to discuss this topic, or send new questions to kwolfgang@advanceweb.com.      

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Introducing a New DNP Blogger
October 5, 2012 10:00 AM by Susan Vanbeuge

I am Dr. Susan VanBeuge, family nurse practitioner and assistant professor at the University of Nevada Las Vegas. My nursing career began when the decision to return for a second bachelors degree in nursing. At the time, I started volunteering in an emergency department to see if this was my calling. I was volunteering at a military teaching hospital and was taken under the wing of nurses, medical residents and attending physicians immediately. Barely into didactic coursework, I was in the thick of nursing and learning in this environment. My mentor was a seasoned ER nurse who taught me the values of nursing: caring, knowledge, teamwork, and professionalism. I worked in various emergency departments for seven years, and then returned to graduate school to earn an MSN and become a family nurse practitioner.

I first heard of the DNP degree at a conference in 2005 and was intrigued. I watched as it gained momentum and interest, and then made the decision to pursue the degree. I graduated in 2009 with the doctor of nursing practice degree feeling a great sense of accomplishment. The coursework was a set of tools for my practice, which took me to a different level of understanding, practice and professional development. In my own experience, this gave me the literacy to not only read research but also apply to practice. I developed a better understanding and application of health care policy, quality assurance/improvement, statistics, evidence-based practice and application of research to clinical problems I had observed. My areas of interest include cancer survivorship, interprofessional collaboration and research, diabetes, thyroid disease and health promotion/cancer prevention strategies.

Editor's note: The DNP Answers blog addresses your questions about the DNP. This post is contributed by Susan S. VanBeuge, DNP, APN, FNP-BC, CNE, an assistant professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in the nurse practitioner and DNP programs. Comment below to discuss this topic, or send new questions to jford@advanceweb.com.

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Curriculum in Post-BSN and Post-MSN DNP Programs
September 28, 2012 9:55 AM by Lisa Chism, NP

Q: Can you explain how the curriculum will look in a post-BSN DNP program in comparison to a post-MSN DNP program? 

A: A post-BSN program includes the clinical component neccessary for advanced practice nursing specialization. In other words, the curriculum in a post-BSN program typically will begin with the core competencies neccessary for a nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, certified nurse midwife or certified registered nurse anesthetist specialization. The second half of the program would include content congruent with the Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice. A post-BSN program would be approximately 70-80 credits, depending on the program. A post-masters program would average 30-40 credits. The challenge with the post-BSN programs will be the socialization of these students into the role of advanced practice as well as being doctorally prepared. Special attention should be paid to help these students develop their roles as advanced practice nurses.

Editor's note: At the DNP Answers blog we take your questions about the DNP and answer them as best we can. This post is written by blogger Lisa Chism, NP, DNP, NCMP. Lisa was selected as the 2011 North American Menopause Society Certified Menopause Provider of the Year. Comment below to discuss this topic, or send new questions to jford@advanceweb.com.      

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DNP Clinical Projects: Assigned or Self-Guided
September 21, 2012 8:22 AM by Meg Carman

Q: Is it common practice for a DNP program to assign students to sites and projects, or do most allow students to explore their own passions and interests?

A: This is an institution-specific issue. Some DNP programs work in partnership with a healthcare system to address clinical questions or quality issues that have been identified. Students are assigned to work on various projects, researching and coming up with evidence-based recommendations or actually implementing and evaluating change. The focus of the DNP program is translational science, rather than research. Students should not be assigned to help with research projects, but it may be reasonable to have them assist with evidence-based practice or quality improvement activities.

I think this brings up a good point for the nurse who is investigating various DNP programs of study. I really enjoyed having the opportunity to effect change in my clinical practice and examine all the aspects of organizational readiness that impact an evidence-based practice project. If I had other priorities in completing my DNP degree, I may have searched for a program that would make it very clear cut, assigning me to a project and including an implementation phase versus making recommendations. The obstacles that one meets with a full capstone can impede the process and delay graduation!

Editor's note: The DNP Answers blog addresses your questions about the DNP. This post is contributed by blogger Meg Carman, DNP, ACNP-BC, CEN, who serves on faculty in the ABSN program at the Duke University School of Nursing in Durham, N.C. She also practices with Wake Emergency Physicians in Raleigh. Comment below to discuss this topic, or send new questions to jford@advanceweb.com.

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Educational Opportunities for Those Not Wanting a DNP
September 14, 2012 12:36 PM by Lisa Chism, NP

Q: How can NPs who don't go back to get a DNP elevate their knowledge in similar ways?

A: Great question! My first suggestion is to become familiar with the Essentials for Doctoral Education for Advanced Nurisng Practice. The essentials guide the curriculum of DNP programs and will reflect much of the coursework. The essentials are:

  1. Scientific underpinnings for practice
  2. Organizational and systems leadership for quality improvement and systems thinking
  3. Clinical scholarship and analytical methods for evidence-based practice
  4. Information systems/technology and patient care technology for the improvement and transformation of healthcare
  5. Healthcare policy for advocacy in healthcare
  6. Interprofessional collaboration for improving patient and population health outcomes
  7. Clinical prevention and population health for improving the nation's health
  8. Advanced nursing practice

I would also be familiar with all of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing documents related to the DNP including the DNP task force documents. This will help you become aware of the relevance of the DNP degree and the progression toward a DNP degree in nursing.

You may also want to review the IOM documents starting with "To Err is Human" (1999). Many reports (2001, 2003, 2010) followed this report and published recommendations that have led to the development of the DNP degree.

Basically, any material that reviews the above topics, including the essentials will help you become familiar with topics discussed in a DNP program. If I had to focus on a few, I would prepare myself with leadership skills and skills in evidence-based practice. Also, there are certification programs available in Information technology which is also a recommendation of the IOM and a focus of DNP programs.

Editor's note: At the DNP Answers blog we take your questions about the DNP and answer them as best we can. This post is written by blogger Lisa Chism, NP, DNP, NCMP. Lisa was selected as the 2011 North American Menopause Society Certified Menopause Provider of the Year. Comment below to discuss this topic, or send new questions to jford@advanceweb.com.      

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Graduation Regalia for DNPs
September 7, 2012 12:30 PM by Michael Zychowicz

Q: I've heard that some universities don't allow DNP graduates to wear the same graduation regalia as other doctorate degree graduates. What's the common practice for graduation regalia?

A: I have not heard of schools "not allowing" DNP graduates to wear the same regalia as PhD graduates. In my humble opinion, this is unfortunate if there is even a perception of inferiority for the DNP or inequity as a terminal degree. It has been my limited experience that schools across a specific campus have the same cap and gown but with varying hoods reflective of the specific school. When I graduated from Case Western, the DNP students had the same cap and gown as the PhD students.

I would be curious to hear from readers who have heard or seen this to be true.

Editor's note: At the DNP Answers blog we take your questions about the DNP and answer them as best we can. This post is written by blogger Michael Zychowicz, DNP, ANP-C, ONP-C, FAANP, chairman for master's programs at Duke University School of Nursing. Comment below to discuss this topic, or send new questions to jford@advanceweb.com.

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DNP Utilization
August 31, 2012 9:06 AM by Catherine Nichols

Q: Do you know of any recent data indicating the number of DNPs currently in faculty positions in the U.S.? Also, do you know of any data on the yearly number of scholarly publications by DNPs? Thanks.

A: The DNP degree is the new kid on the block in the world of healthcare doctoral degrees. Because of the fairly new acceptance and implementation of these graduates, there stands virtually no literature on how these DNP graduates are being utilized currently in the healthcare industry. These graduates are used in a multitude of areas, as the degree gives the graduate a vast array of opportunities for utilization and healthcare provision. 

Zaccagnini and White (2011) define multiple areas of healthcare in which the DNP role is, or potentially can be, utilized. In the practice setting, current DNP roles of clinicians (ANP, Pediatric NP, FNP, Nurse Midwife, Nurse Anesthetist, and CNS) are expanded upon and broadened. Other roles DNPs are or can embrace are those of the nurse as expert theorist, informaticist, researcher, lobbyist/political executive, educator, entrepreneur, public and community health executive, etc...(Zaccagnini & White, 2011). To date however, there are no published studies revealing the actual utilization and practice of current DNPs.

The evidence of the DNPs' great popularity points to its practical success in the healthcare industry, although unproven. The popularity of the degree is exemplified by the growing number of colleges and universities offering the degree, and by the increased rates of enrollment in the DNP programs. According to the AACN, there are currently 184 colleges and universities across the U.S. offering the DNP degree, surpassing the 126 PhD programs now offered, and 101 programs are in the planning stages. The immense popularity can be seen as well through the exponential growth of DNP enrollees. From 2010 to 2011 alone, the number of DNP enrollees grew from 7, 034 to 9,094. The increasing number of DNP graduates is impressive as well with 1,282 in 2010 to 1,595 in 2011 (AACN).

The growth of this degree brings with it the development of an equal number of scholarly projects and publications. There again, is not a central clearing house of published scholarly projects of DNP graduates, but the number can be estimated deductively.  The final requirement of the degree is that of a capstone project that is published in a profession journal. All DNP graduates have met this requirement in order to obtain the doctorate. The annual number of scholarly project publications then, correlates to the number of annual graduates of the DNP degree.

The DNP online community organization provides a listing of searchable DNP projects. These must be submitted to the website by the DNP, so it is not a comprehensive list. The organization is a champion of disseminating these projects, with the hope of becoming a national clearing house of scholarly DNP publications. Much remains to be done to accomplish this goal. You can access these online at the DNP website: http://www.doctorsofnursingpractice.org.

Research on the current utilization and contributions of this new degree is in demand, and happens to be the topic of my scholarly project. The utilization of DNPs in Michigan Public and Teaching hospital systems is its focus, and will be posted on the DNP website in the not-too-distant future. This is an exciting and revolutionary time in our nation's healthcare history. We as DNPs are given the opportunity to fill multiple voids in our system, ultimately for the improved provision of care of our nation's population.

References

  • American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2009). Doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs frequently asked questions. Retrieved from http://www.aacn.nche.edu
  • Zaccagnini, M. E., White, K.W. (2011). Doctor of nursing practice essentials: A new model for advanced practice. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett

 

Editor's note: At the DNP Answers blog, nurse practitioners with a DNP answer your questions about the degree. This question is answered by blogger Catherine Nichols, MSN, ANP-BC, a DNP student and adult nurse practitioner. Comment below to discuss this topic, or send new questions to jford@advanceweb.com.

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Certification if Graduating With an MSN in 2015
August 24, 2012 10:16 AM by Mai Kung

Q: I am just finishing my BSN and will graduate in December 2012. I have a BSBA, ADN, LPN-Diploma and associate degree in general education. I am now considering doing the FNP program but I will be in the middle of the program when the DNP is required to set for the boards in 2015. I work full-time, I have a family that depends on my income, and I am a little scared about the doctorate program. I’m not sure if I am smart enough. If I do start the MSN program for FNP, what will happen with the MSN-FNP degree in 2015? Will those students be allowed to set for the boards in 2015 or have to apply to a DNP program to finish meeting the requirements?

A: I want to applaud you for your persistence and your hard work attaining all these degrees and having the desire to do more! FNP is a great choice, but of course I am a little biased because I have enjoyed being a FNP and a career in nursing.

FNP practice requirements vary from state to state. Being licensed to practice is different than being certified. Currently California, Kansas and Indiana do not require national certification to practice. However, I highly recommend an NP be certified in his or her practice specialty. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing recommends (does not mandate) converting FNP education to doctoral programs by 2015. But, as far as certification goes there are no plans to require a doctoral degree to sit for either the ANCC or AANP certification exam by 2015.

Choosing between a master’s and doctoral program is a personal decision. In my opinion it is about making a commitment based on your unique set of circumstances. In other words, do what is best for you. We often feel uncertain about how best to reach our dreams, and we may consequently doubt our abilities. But through life’s challenges we also grow to be confident. With persistence and hard work, we may indeed reach our dreams. I sense you have the work ethic to be successful in either program. Do spend some time researching various programs and their requirements. Also, be cognizant that some universities are in the process of transitioning from a master’s to a doctoral program and you want to be prepared for changes associated with this move. For more information about DNP program transition, read Current MSN Students and the DNP Transition

Editor's note: At the DNP Answers blog, nurse practitioners with a DNP answer your questions about the degree. This question is answered by blogger Mai Kung, NP, DNP. Comment below to discuss this topic, or send new questions to jford@advanceweb.com.

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The DNP: What Do You Want to Know?
August 17, 2012 11:19 AM by Jennifer Ford

The decision to go back for a DNP. The excitement of being accepted into the program. Juggling work and school. Developing a capstone project. The joy of graduation. Applying knowledge to practice: The DNP Answers blog contributors have all been through it. The purpose of this blog is to increase understanding of the doctor of nursing practice degree and answer any and all questions posed by readers about the degree. Here are some recent popular posts:

What do you want to know about the DNP that can't be answered in an FAQ? Contributors Mai Kung, Lisa Chism, Meg Carman, Catherine Nichols and Michael Zychowicz will give you fair and unbiased answers, with their own personal touch. Submit your questions in the comments below or email them to senior associate editor Jennifer Ford at jford@advanceweb.com.

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The Anatomy of an Online DNP Course
August 10, 2012 9:52 AM by Meg Carman

Q: In my research I find that many DNP programs offer online courses. I have never taken an online course. How does it work, generally?

I felt the same trepidation in approaching my DNP program, which was completely online, other than two on-campus weekends. I had never considered myself to be tech-savvy; what a challenge!

Many DNP programs are online, which facilitates distance learning and therefore increase choice as well as the flexibility many nurses need to listen to lectures and classes during off hours. In addition, you can play the lectures multiple times, pause and take breaks, or go back to hear the material a second time if it is missed.

Different institutions may use different platforms, such as Blackboard or Sakai. Courses are set up with a menu customized by the instructor, who may choose to add discussion boards or chat rooms for group interaction. Discussion boards are organized with “threads” or streams that originate from an initial comment or question posed to the group. Participants are expected to comment and respond, providing citations to support their statements. Chat rooms occur in real time and can generate some pretty vibrant discussion!

Online courses typically have a link to the syllabus, schedule or calendar, and weekly lecture content that can be accessed throughout the semester. There may be drop boxes for assignments, which also allow for return of graded documents. Reading assignments and links to resources such as the library or registrar’s office are also at your fingertips.

I found it to be very organized and user friendly. Certainly, any platform has it’s glitches. In general, I found that the online format facilitated my learning and incited me to stretch and grow in terms of using technologies for my adult learning.

Editor's note: Here at the DNP Answers blog we take your questions about the DNP and answer them as best we can. This question is answered by blogger Meg Carman, DNP, ACNP-BC, CEN, who serves on faculty in the ABSN program at the Duke University School of Nursing in Durham, N.C. She also practices with Wake Emergency Physicians in Raleigh. Comment below to discuss this topic, or send new questions to jford@advanceweb.com.


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