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ADVANCE Perspective: Nurses

IV Clinics: A Do or A Don’t?

Published January 22, 2013 1:53 PM by Catlin Nalley
Whether you have a cold, the flu, or a hangover there is now a new treatment option available.

"Hydration clinics," which provide intravenous (IV) fluids to individuals dealing with mild to moderate dehydration, are appearing across the country, according to TIME.

One such clinic is revive, which opened on Dec. 15, 2012, in Chicago. Led by Jack Dybis, DO, and staffed by ED nurses, revive has already seen more than 150 patients, noted TIME.

Potential candidates provide a complete medical history as well as current symptoms. If they meet requirements, nurses then start a line. Exact contents of the IV depend on patient needs, reported TIME.

Other clinics include Revivme, run by ER physicians in Miami, and Hangover Heaven in Las Vegas, operated out of a bus by a board-certified anesthesiologist.

Such clinics might provide less expensive, convenient options to patients, but is it worth it?

Healthcare professionals are concerned that the benefits do not outweigh the potential risks, including infection and side effects to the drugs used such as ketorolac, which can cause kidney damage, stated TIME's article.

Others worry that individuals with underlying medical conditions will utilize clinics when they should be seeking treatment for a more serious issue. Additionally, for those who seek out IV treatment to relieve hangover symptoms, some fear it could lead to the development of alcohol abuse, according to TIME.

Do you think IV Clinics are a good idea? Would you recommend their use to your patients?
posted by Catlin Nalley

3 comments

SO disappointing that this is what we have been reduced to to provide access to medical intervention.  When we have "professionals" who are capitalizing on the uneducated health care consumer.  Rather than open clinicals that can fix a hangover, why not develop a clinic that would actually have a long term positive impact?  I can answer that...you wouldn't make money:( No wonder the federal government has had to become involved in our industry...  

Kerri February 13, 2013 8:59 AM

This concept appears to make about as much sense as the "oxygen bars" that have been cropping up around the country, and are utilized to "revive" and restore clientele.

If you are sick enough to require hydration, then you also need an assessment.

Why hydrate when there may be an underlying infection, such as pneumonia, UTI, or worse.

As far as encouraging alcoholism, the disease is such a complex neuro-biophysical phenomenom that an IV bag should have minimal impact one way or another.

The idea seems more about making a quick $$ off the naivete of consumers, rather than providing access to the underserved.

We can do better than this!

Diane, Acute Care - Nurse Practitioner, Advocate Condell January 28, 2013 11:02 AM
Libertyville IL

I think it would'nt be a bad idea. It could possibly free up some space in the ER for more urgent issues. Infection is a risk everywhere. Allergic reactions can also occur anytime when you have no known allergies. I don't think it would encourage alcohol abuse. The biggest concern is qualified staff and availability. in the present economy any place where people can afford to go and get the help they need is worth it.

paula, rn January 27, 2013 2:22 AM
newark NJ

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