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Nurse on the Run

Dear Nurse Bully...

Published November 22, 2013 3:01 PM by Lorettajo Kapinos

Dear Nurse Bully,

 The first time I met you, I wasn't even a nurse yet. I was young, struggling to adjust to college life. I thought I went to a college prep high school, but nothing prepared me for the jump in academic challenge. Instead of guiding me, you told me to quit. You said I'd never make it as a nurse.  I thought this was normal.

The second time I met you, I still wasn't a nurse. I was a student nurse assistant, halfway through school. Instead of teaching me the finer points of nursing, you complained about me behind my back. You wrote me up. You shut me out. I thought this was normal.

For a few years, Nurse Bully, I retreated into my own space. I struggled. I lied a few  times because I feared ridicule for not knowing everything. Thank God I didn't make any lethal mistakes. I thought this was normal.

I met you again a few times over the years. Each time, I swam in a pool of confusion, hurt and frustration. I nearly quit nursing altogether because I thought this was normal.

Once, I even tried to join you. I thought that if other successful nurses were tough like that than I should be, too. But, I didn't like it. It did not feel normal at all.

I often wonder, Nurse Bully, if you would recognize yourself if I called you out. I doubt it. I believe bullying is in the eye of the receiver. Maybe my actions were once perceived as bullying. I do not know.  But what I do know, is that I don't want this to be accepted as normal anymore. I don't think anyone does.  

So, please Nurse Bully, stop and think of what you are saying to your coworker. Are you helping him or her with your words? Is it necessary to belittle someone just because you feel stressed? Is it too much to give a little guidance now and again?  Because that is what should be our normal.

 Sincerely,

Me--Nurse Loretta 

 

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36 comments

Nurses, Nurses, FNP, NP MD please be an example for others!!

cindy February 10, 2014 2:40 PM

I used to work for the VA in Wichita Kansas on the TLC unit. There are three people along with the two nurse managers who made my life a total hell for over nine months.  Nothing has happened to them as the paper trail for them has somehow disappeared.  They have rained terror at the cost of the patients, good nurses have left, I left, the social worker left, they continue to pick on people but when you look at the personnel rules about bullying they should have ben written up and eventually fired.  I don't understand why to keep three people who do poor patient care, are absolutely nasty to work with.  They seem to get to stay while others have to leave.  I actually caught pneumonia twice last year and the second time it wouldn't leave so I never returned.  After I have quit I haven't missed work due to illness.  They caused me to be so sick.  I totally understand how it feels to want to hurt someone and understand how children take their own lives it is so bad and interferes with the care you give.  They are already giving poor care but realistic they cause others to give poor care I was hiding in patient rooms to do charting and then only charting as I could.  The one RN would ostercise me out in the open patients saw her yell at me call me a horrible nurse and even the nurse manager observed and did nothing.

Bullying in nursing should not be allowed and taken more seriously.

Lisa, Varied - RN, Nurse Finders January 3, 2014 1:16 PM
Wichita KS

I have had the privilege  of working with many wonderful RN's during my more than 45year career! Yes, there's been the occasional bully, but I just  concentrated on doing my job, and going home to my family. I have always gotten immense satisfaction from my job! On my floor we pride ourselves on working as a team, and helping (or trying to) when someone is drowning! From my experience nurses are a wonderful, caring  group of people.

Peg, Acute care - RN, Lahey health December 27, 2013 5:43 PM
Burlington MA

Bullies are out there for even us seasoned nurses.  They acuse you of telling management things and you have no idea of what they are talking about.  They sand bag you with patients because they choose not to work but stand arround socializing and making in fun of you because you are a hard worker.  They like to believe they know everything in reality they do not.  I have been in nursing for 41 years and I have seen more bullying than there should be in a field that is supposed to be caring and supportive.  They are when it suits their needs.

Jay , ER - RN, BSN December 24, 2013 4:22 PM

Bullies cannot be allowed to prevail in our hospitals, or in society at large. This week's flak about the Duck Dynasty bully is a case-in-point.  We've all known "mean girls" like him in middle school.  They grow up and continue to bully unless we all stand up to them, protect the victims, and NEVER be silent by-standers.

Alice Peterson, Clinical Educator December 24, 2013 7:22 AM
Lakeland FL

I have witnessed and experienced nurse bullying since I began my career.I could not believe the unprofessional behavior of nurses.I thought I would be working with pros that believed in a team approach and would support each other in difficult situations.Boy,was I ever wrong.It was the complete opposite.After observing the egregious behavior of many nurses,I surmised that the meanest ones who were always trying to cause trouble were the most unhappy ones.They have little to no control at home and come to work and try to make everyone else as miserable as they are.I'm at the point to where I either quit nursing or go to grad school and hope working as a NP will be an improvement over the poor working conditions at nursing facilities.What a great disappointment it would be to find out that NP's,PA's and MD's were as petty as many RN's and LPN's.

Ben, LTC - RN,BSN December 23, 2013 5:08 PM
Hickory NC

I too have experienced much of what I am reading in the comments above and I believe that such treatment scars you for life!

I was so harrassed by my managers at a previous job that I thought that I was going to have a nervous breakdown. My co-workers could not believe how I was being treated, as I was very good at my job. I left the job and took another position that left me with a huge pay cut just to remove myself from the situation.

I could name numerous other instances of poor treatment by other nurses, especially while working in the operating room.

I will never understand this behavior!

Deb December 23, 2013 7:58 AM

I KNOW TOO WELL ABOUT NURSE BULLYING. EVEN AS  A NURSING STUDENT I DEALT WITH THE RN FROM HELL. STILL EVEN REMEMBER HER NAME.  WHAT SHE DID TO ME IN NURSING SCHOOL HAS HAUNTED ME THROUGHOUT MY WHOLE NURSING CAREER. ALL I WANT IS TO ONE DAY BE ASSIGNED TO TAKE CARE OF HER  AS HER NURSE AND KILL HER WITH KINDNESS AND GENUINE NURSING SKILLS. I HAD A MANAGER ONCE THAT MADE MY LIFE HELL TILL SHE GOT ILL. I WENT TO SEE HER AND TOLD HER EVEN THOUGH I DON T  LIKE HER MUCH AND  SHE WAS NOT NICE OR EVEN A  FAIR PERSON  I COULD NOT EVER DESIRE WHAT SHE WAS EXPERIENCING. I JUST COULD NOT STOOP TO HER LEVEL. NOW I AT A JOB NOW AND  I M EXPERIENCING REAL DAILY BULLYING. SOMETIMES SO SUBTLE AND CUTS LIKE A KNIFE .  I COME IN I DO MY JOB . REALLY GOOD AT WHAT I DO AND AM CONTINUOUSLY UNDERMINED PUSHED AROUND OVERLOADED. EVERYTHING I DO UNDER SCRUTINY. A CO NURSE HIRED ABOUT EIGHT  MONTHS AGO TO EASE AND HELP AND BE MY BACK UP WHEN NEEDED  WALKING AROUND DICTATING  AND TAKING CREDIT FOR MY  AND OTHERS SUGGESTIONS AND WORK. CONSTANTLY EMAILING  AND TEXTING OUR MANAGER FOR ANY LITTLE THING. CONSTANTLY BROWN NOSING AND MAKING HERSELF LOOK IMPORTANT AND INDISPENSABLE AT EVERYONE ELSE S EXPENSE. AND THE SAD THING IS THAT SHE IS NOT THE ONE REALLY DOING THE JOB OR THE ONE THEY GO TO WHEN THERE IS A PROBLEM OR  SOMETHING IMPORTANT THAT NEEDS TO BE ATTENDED TO. SHE IS NOT THE ONE  PEOPLE DEPEND ON. I ASKED MORE THAN A MONTH AGO FOR MY MANAGER TO SIT DOWN SO WE CAN TALK. SHE HAS NOT ACKNOWLEDGE ME NOR MADE THE TIME FOR ME YET MIND YOU I AM THE SENIOR NURSE THERE. BUT IS QUICK TO SEND ME AN EMAIL IF FOR SOMETHING I MAY OR MAY HAVE NOT DONE. OR WRITE ME UP FOR SOMETHING THAT IF IT WAS A PROBLEM COULD HAD BEEN DISCUSSED  AND ISSUED A VERBAL WARNING. WHILE THE NEW  NURSE HAS BEEN OUT MORE THAN SHE HAS BEEN AT THIS POSITION.    I FEEL LIKE DANIEL IN THE LIONS DEN . SURROUNDED BY BACK BITING VISCOUS SELF SERVING VIPERS WAITING TO BE POUNCED UPON AND DESTROYED. BULLY NURSES TAKE HEED. FOR EVERYONE YOU DESTROY OR HURT. I TRULY BELIEVE YOU WILL PAY FOR ONE WAY OR ANOTHER WHETHER ITS WITH YOUR CAREER, YOUR HEALTH AND SOMEONE YOU VALUE OR TREASURE . WHAT YOU DISH OUT TODAY YOU WILL RECEIVE TIMES TEN. WHAT YOU ATTAIN  AT SOMEONES ELSE S EXPENSE WILL EVENTUALLY LOSE ITS LUSTER AND JUSTICE WILL PREVAIL. AND IF GOD WILLS IT WE WE SEE IT MANIFEST IT SELF IN OUR LIFETIME

elizabeth bourdony, pediatrics - lpn, pocono kids pediatrics December 22, 2013 6:35 PM
east stroudsburg PA

Left my DON job and home and moved to take care of failing parents, buying a home so they could live with me.  I was hired as DON for a faith-based org. when a new administrator (Hospital background) came on the scene.  

She stalked me, made me return from planned vacations, pushed herself into my private life, pouted whenever I made plans that didn't include her and basically smothered me with unwanted attention.  When I drew the line in the sand, she ordered my nurse managers to report directly to her.  Once fully informed, she confronted me with issues, then derided me for not knowing what was going on. She eliminated nursing positions, then doubled my work-load, forcing me to take on those responsibilities.  

A year of this and she finally fired me, telling everyone I had resigned due to pressures of taking care of my family.  She created a non-clinical position for me as a glorified secretary. I was trapped, humiliated, docked thousands of dollars a year in pay and forced to read emails from her, "Are you having fun yet?" After 3 months, went to the CEO.  He didn't have a clue and was mortified at her treatment of me. Bless his heart, he created a new position for me, comprised of several part time open positions, allowing me  to report directly to him.  I stayed several more years, until my parents both died, then sold my house and retired a year early.  

That woman stole my career from me.  She preyed upon me, knowing I couldn't just up and leave. I ended up taking antidepressants and antianxiety meds because I had to interact with her daily, unable to ever confront her about her bullying.  I may have been "salvaged", but she was never taken to task for her behavior.  Instead, she has been promoted to an executive position in the organization, and is currently undermining and demoralizing everyone she supervises.  

I've never been the same and I'll never recover from her cavalier destruction of my beloved career.

Been There, Done That, RN, CDONA/LTC, Retired    

sarah Craig, Long Term Care - Cert. DON, Retired December 22, 2013 2:42 PM
St. Petersburg FL

As a young child in the 1950's, I wanted to become in nurse.

Adolescence and dating distracted me from that goal, and I did not earn the grades necessary for nursing school.  I entered UNC-Chapel Hill with the goal of finding a husband and graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration.

My inner strength and determination led me to a successful 25 year career working for Coca Cola USA, The Dr Pepper Company and, finally, owning my own business for 10 years.  As I was considering retirement, a 52 year old family member experienced a disabling stroke which rendered him unable to function intelligently thereon.  Even though I was a legitimate family member, because of the extensive care my stricken brother-in-law needed, it was his attentive nurses who became a real family to him. The experience led me to try to become one of those people, a nurse, so that I could help others, and that I did, graduating from nursing school at the age of 50.

Numerous times over the past 9 years, the nurse bullies I have encountered have made me want to end my career as an RN  working in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.  When the nurse bullies wrote "put your big panties on" on the community board in our unit, I left the room.  That day, the same nurse bullies assigned me to the most critical patient on our unit along with "first admission" meaning I would assist at the delivery of our next patient.  I reported them, in writing, for placing me in a complicated assignment when, knowing them, I would have no back up, and therefore would not be in a safe assignment.  I was invited by a manager to complete a peer review for one of the bullies at the time of her annual review.  The list of incidences I provided to our management team convinced them to reign in the bullies, and, for me, the bullying has ended.

The bullying continues on our unit, however, and it breaks my heart to see my co-workers with their decades long RN careers go through it.  I'll be 60 years old next year and have no plans to retire.  Someday, I will take the next step to halt the bullying in our unit completely by making it not so much fun for the bullies!  Then we all will work in peace and concentrate on helping our tiny patients who are the true victims of bullying in our NICU.  

Patty, NICU - RN December 22, 2013 11:17 AM
NC

As a young child in the 1950's, I wanted to become in nurse.

Adolescence and dating distracted me from that goal, and I did not earn the grades necessary for nursing school.  I entered UNC-Chapel Hill with the goal of finding a husband and graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration.

My inner strength and determination led me to a successful 25 year career working for Coca Cola USA, The Dr Pepper Company and, finally, owning my own business for 10 years.  As I was considering retirement, a 52 year old family member experienced a disabling stroke which rendered him unable to function intelligently thereon.  Even though I was a legitimate family member, because of the extensive care my stricken brother-in-law needed, it was his attentive nurses who became a real family to him. The experience led me to try to become one of those people, a nurse, so that I could help others, and that I did, graduating from nursing school at the age of 50.

Numerous times over the past 9 years, the nurse bullies I have encountered have made me want to end my career as an RN  working in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.  When the nurse bullies wrote "put your big panties on" on the community board in our unit, I left the room.  That day, the same nurse bullies assigned me to the most critical patient on our unit along with "first admission" meaning I would assist at the delivery of our next patient.  I reported them, in writing, for placing me in a complicated assignment when, knowing them, I would have no back up, and therefore would not be in a safe assignment.  I was invited by a manager to complete a peer review for one of the bullies at the time of her annual review.  The list of incidences I provided to our management team convinced them to reign in the bullies, and, for me, the bullying has ended.

The bullying continues on our unit, however, and it breaks my heart to see my co-workers with their decades long RN careers go through it.  I'll be 60 years old next year and have no plans to retire.  Someday, I will take the next step to halt the bullying in our unit completely by making it not so much fun for the bullies!  Then we all will work in peace and concentrate on helping our tiny patients who are the true victims of bullying in our NiCU.  

Patty, NICU - RN December 22, 2013 11:16 AM
NC

As an former military man, I thought Nursing would be a piece of cake, was I ever wrong.  The constant bullying, in-fighing, back stabbing, and,malicious gossip that Nurses used on each other was ridiculous.  I even saw patients hurt, just so one Nurse could look better than another.  I actually would rather go back in combat than be a nurse again!

Rod, ED then LTC - BS RN December 22, 2013 8:56 AM
Venice FL

Unfortunately, I have been bullied mostly by managers, sometimes by peers, always by RNs. The last episode led to my being fired for what was a minor mistake and following program policy (the manager just disagreed with the decision, which was a group decision, and I was singled out). Although I tried to continue working, I decided to retire early because I was experiencing too many flashbacks. You see, the worse the bullying and the more episodes you experience, you eventually develop PTSD. I was so worried about the possibility of a repeated experience that I could no longer put myself in that environment. %0d%0aI had found that I was usually targeted, and especially by my last bully (it was actually two bullies, since the administrator, who had sucked all the joy out of the program, also joined in), because of the number of credentials that I carried, along with latest nursing care information. When you become targeted for this reason, you begin losing your passion, until it's no longer there anymore. Given my experience, though, I imagine that I am not the only repeated target, who just left the profession, when I might have worked for another 12 years. It's a shame that this behavior is wasting careers and resources - and nothing is being done about it, despite the interest of the Joint Commission in eliminating this behavior.

Linda Indyke, psych - retired RN December 21, 2013 9:28 PM
Cockeysville MD

Bullying & Intimidation of nurses is ALIVE & Thriving...NCBON must address these unhealthy tactics...I've experienced it first hand after working in the healthcare field for over 30 years.  It's an atrocity to humanity for upper level nursing management to get a "pass" with this barbaric behavior without consequences &  expect to be respected in their roles...PLEASE I don't think so! One should question the true integrity of their previous and or current nursing care/Tx to patients.  (It's quite frightening to think about that)

Patricia Young, , RN-Supervisor NCDPS December 21, 2013 6:57 PM
Concord NC

I have experienced bullying....and continue to do so...even after  40+ years "in the business"....I do feel that the bullies are so insecure...they attempt to make themselves feel better...and more competent at the expense of others...I ignore the bullies at my workplace...and try to encourage our new nurses to do the same.

Carol, LTC - LPN, CPCC December 21, 2013 5:53 PM
Winslow Twp NJ

I think some of the mean nurses need to take a better look at themselves. Did they really want to be nurses or just looking for a job.quit eating your young and be there for them when they need an star hand if you are struggling through nursing school, just keep going don't give up

Karen, Urology - Lpn December 21, 2013 5:17 PM
Fort Myers FL

AMEN TO ALL , THOSE WHO HAVE HAD BAD AND THOSE WHO HAVE HAD GOOD EXPERIENCES.  I WAS BLESSED BECAUSE I HAVE HAD BOTH, THE BAD ONES FORCED ME TO BECOME BETTER  AND THE GOOD ONES INSPIRED ME TO BECOME THE BEST,  I  LOVE MY JOB AS A NURSE, WOULD NOT CHANGE IT FOR ANY OTHER , THROUGH THE LAST 30 YEARS I HAVE WORKED IN MANY FIELDS OF NURSING AND I HAVE BEEN FACE TO FACE WITH THOSE WHO ATE THEIR YOUNG FROM INSTRUCTORS , TO PRECEPTORS AND MANAGERS AND YES DOCTORS, BUT AS THE YEARS WENT BY I LEARNED THAT IF I LET THESE PEOPLE AFFECT ME I WOULD SELF DESTRUCT INSTEAD I PUT ON MY BIG GIRL PANTS AND PERSEVERED, BECAME ASSERTIVE WITHOUT BEING ABUSIVE AND HELPED  OTHERS BY BEING KIND AND PATIENT. PEOPLE ARE PEOPLE AND THERE WILL ALWAYS BE ONE OR THE OTHER LEARN FROM BOTH AND CHOOSE TO BE THE BETTER.

cary yee, OR - RN December 21, 2013 11:11 AM
miami FL

How sad to read this article.  30 yrs serving as a nurse in numerous medical settings, I met most beautiful people, truly serving others, patiently and kindly caring for the sick, injured, sometime hopelessly depressed, unreasonable patients, teaching and guiding young new nurses with compassion and pride.  I guess I am a lucky one to met all good nurses throughout my career.  

Suzie, RN, FNP December 21, 2013 7:51 AM

I am so please to see this best kept secret, coming out of the closet. Publicly exposing the bullies, is moving the nursing profession one step forward.  Leaders in the nursing profession have for ever ignored the cry of many good and wonderful nurses.  A great number of those nurses, are no longer with us; while the bullies remain supported and empowered. It is time to empower, not the bully, but the nurses that support, mentor and treat other nurses with respect,weather old or newcomer in to the field of nursing. Remember "knowledge is shared" Therefore If you have knowledge "let others light their candles in it"

Jenny, Obstetrics - RN, Christian Hospital December 21, 2013 12:41 AM
Washington DC

I have been a nurse for 27 years and have worked in a variety of settings.  Yes, bullying is rampant in the hospital, but any nurse knows they have to be strong to survive.  Do the right thing, be true to yourself and your patients, and that's all that matters.

What is worse, and on the rise, is apathy.  And that is even scarier, because it affects everyone.  When it affects the patient, sometimes bad things happen.  If your nurse can't be bothered following policy, or best practice, you are at the mercy of someone who doesn't take pride in their profession or themselves.  This is a sadder reality than bullying, and isn't as hot a topic!

Mimi Wisnewski, Critical Care - RN, MSN, Hospital December 20, 2013 10:16 PM
NJ

Unfortunately there are people who feel taller when they step on the backs of others. So many of us have had terrible experiences as new grads or new staff members dealing with senior nurses who chose to talk about how unprepared we are instead of helping to prepare us. We're dependent upon each other as professionals to pass the torch to young nurses who need support and mentoring. Be the role model you hope to encounter, be generous with your knowledge - share it and do it proudly.

Andrea, School Nurse December 16, 2013 2:59 PM
Westfield NJ

I  have experienced the same type of bullying from my supervisor,  she has made statements to me saying that no one else would hire me and that I could never make it in a nursing home, this was said in her office with the door open for every one in the nurses station to hear, while she was talking to me other employes came in and out of her office. At one time  I thought about  giving up  but  decided  that I was not going to allow some one to make me quit. Usually people like this have problems at home.

Doris, , LPN assisted living December 16, 2013 2:57 PM
Rockord IL

Thank you, Loretta for a beautifully written, insightful article!

Mary Grosso December 16, 2013 10:35 AM

I have experienced nothing but horrible "experienced" nurses with extremely poor attitudes and nothing nice to say even when they spoke about their personal lives.  I find nurses and doctors to be the most miserable people in the country.  I find healthcare to be an awful place to work.  I hated hospital nursing so much I left to work in an insurance office and still find that nurses are awful and management is just as bad by not addressing anything approporiately.  I do what is right for my patients every day, however, I find choosing to become a Registered Nurse as my second career was the worst mistake of my life.  I am now currently trying to figure out what I would like to do because I don't want to spend the next 25 years of my working life hating my job with a passion.  

Jess, Insurance - RN CCM, -- December 16, 2013 8:44 AM
Albany NY

I have been an RN since 1992. Some of the most toxic, unnurturing  critical people I have ever come in contact with are nirses.The profession seams to be split in two. Good people , and realy  bad people. This is not news. We , in the profesion,all know it but no one has spoken up and said "this needs to be addressed.  I would like to take this opportunity to ask all nurses to weigh in on this subject.

I'm realy glad the person that wrote this artical got published.

Kenneth Morreale, Nursing - Rn December 14, 2013 10:45 PM
NH

While one may run into "Nurse Bully" throughout their careers, your inner strength and sense of pride in the profession should trump any bad behavior. Align yourself with good role models and pay it forward. Remember, we've all been new and green...a helping hand and encouragement would be greatly appreciated.

Denise, FNP December 14, 2013 9:00 PM
Brooklyn NY

I had bullies for teachers in Nursing School and Midwifrey school. My head nurse was a sociopath. And guess what? I still see bullies on the job. An NP screaming at an MA. E-Mails to leave paper trails of humiliation. I can't wait to retire, because I'm tired. I'm tired of watching my back and defending myself. I only hope I made a difference to my patients because I was there for them.

Laura Corbino, OB/GYN - CNM-RN, Clinic December 14, 2013 2:35 PM
Staten Island NY

I have been a witness and a recipient of a nurse bully from a different department at my work place.  The worse part is that she is the quality assurance nurse.  Rather than taking on the role of a leader by educating, encouraging and motivating the staff,  she humiliates in

them in public and gossips about findings throughout the facility.  Employees become distressed and the morale at the work place suffers tremendously.  Her poor tactics are known to our local human resources department by multiple staff members of different levels and the volatile behavior continues to be tolerated.  

Anonymous , LPN December 14, 2013 10:54 AM
Elizabeth NJ

I have been the recipient  of bullying in the workplace,and it is a very hurtful,demeaning experience. However, it has made me a better  nurse. Whenever a new nurse comes to  my unit , I reflect back to how I was treated as a "newby" ,  and I strive to do my  best to make his or her experience. A rewarding one.

Marjorie, Psych - RN, Soh December 14, 2013 9:41 AM
Amityville NY

Thank you eveyrone for your comments. I guess even adversity or negative interactions help shape a nurse into a better one. That's what makes our profession so great--we are all dedicated people who make the best of everything.

Lorettajo Kapinos December 3, 2013 1:43 PM

Nurse eat their young is no longer a myth it is a reality that needs to be tackle with zero tolerance . Zaina Strickland LPN

Zaina November 27, 2013 9:11 PM
MD

Unfortunately, I am quickly learning that there are bullies all across the Healthcare Industry, and it may not be just nurses ( or even doctors) for that matter.

Bullies are scattered all through the ranks of healthcare... MA's, CNA's, nurses, managers, doctors ( though I have been fortunate, and have not experienced this last one much throughout my career)

Joyce, LPN November 23, 2013 5:01 PM

Thank you for writing this letter to nurse bullies. I spent most of my time helping individuals and organizations stop the cycle of nurse bullying. Your story is so similar to mine...and you're right! It's NOT normal and doesn't belong in a profession dedicated to caring and compassion.

Thank you! Big air hug to you and other nurses who are/were made to feel bad about themselves.

Renee

RTConnections

www.rtconnections.com

Renee Thompson November 23, 2013 4:39 PM

I knew Nurse bully very well along the way.  In college it was " you're going to be a BSN figure it out!" Later it was "I would have done it differently ( everyday!!), Oh they can make us doubt our choices, however they were part of why I am where I am today. I had to rise above them and go back to school again. So they did hurt, but they did give me some motivation to not be like them!!

Suzanne Malloy, Pediatrics - CPNP November 22, 2013 5:59 PM
Westfield MA

Unfortunately I think we have all experienced those nurses who tend to "eat their young".....fortunately most of us are not like that and we try to inspire and encourage fledgling nurses to fly on their own..

Tony Mancuso, , RN Mercy ER November 22, 2013 3:46 PM
Somers

Well said.....

I too have been the recipient of a nurse bully and it doesn't feel very good.

Corine Langevin, ED - RN, CDH November 22, 2013 3:43 PM
Hatfield MA

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