Welcome to Health Care POV | sign in | join
PT and the Greater Good

Two Weeks an Expert

Published August 27, 2014 5:56 PM by Dean Metz

I am involved with a networking group of rehab therapists (PT, OT, SLP) that's based back in the US. Earlier this week a member requested information on how to set up a fall prevention program. She was very enthusiastic about the need for such a program where she lived and was looking to start working in a private/home health sort of way. I can see a niche for that!

She admitted she had no experience in that particular area and asked if the group could provide resources so she could cram as much as possible into the next two weeks. She was going to give a presentation to the local community complete with handouts and brochures.

I gave her a link to a very good resource and voiced my opinion that a two-week time frame was indeed, very ambitious. In truth, I was angry. This goes back to a fellow ADVANCE blogger's posting about specialists in different areas of physical therapy. I've worked years to gather the knowledge I have on falls, to build the hands-on experience in assessment and treatment, and to know the implications of medications on those who fall. I've spent time working with other experts in this field (not just physical therapists, but nurses and doctors as well). This person is going to do that in two weeks?

At the best, I can envision this person creating an innocuous service, one that does no harm, may do a bit of good, but can't be anything near what many of her clients will need it to be in terms of multifactorial assessment. At the worst, another group of clients talking around the pool about how therapy is "useless, totally useless."

You Might Also Like...

All in Stride

Using gait training equipment to harness the power of neuroplasticity.

1 comments

Dean,

You will be indirectly assisting those patients with the research you have done. Imagine if the founders of therapy refused or limited their desire to teach or pass on information.  Do you think they discouraged other therapists in their pursuits?

It can be frustrating when another professional does not recognize the work put into a program and they think they can become an expert just by reading the material.  But passing on information to others is valuable in what we do.  

Two weeks may seem like a short time but there are people who learn quick and can assimilate information faster than others.

Jason Marketti August 28, 2014 10:05 AM

leave a comment



To prevent comment spam, please type the code you see below into the code field before submitting your comment. If you cannot read the numbers in the image, reload the page to generate a new one.

Captcha
Enter the security code below:
 

Search

About this Blog


    Dean Metz
    Occupation: Staff Development Specialist
    Setting: New York, NY – Newcastle Upon Tyne, Great Britain
  • About Blog and Author

Keep Me Updated