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Speaking of Apps

Language Lab: Spin & Speak –Social Skills

Published June 26, 2013 9:10 AM by Jeremy Legaspi
Language Lab: Spin & Speak -Social Skills targets language and social skills. This is created by both Speech With Milo and PRC (Prentke-Romich Company) who have a few other apps targeting language/AAC use as well. This app is very similar to Speech With Milo's Articulation Board Game however instead of speech sounds different social scenarios pop up and the student must provide an answer for the question. Game play allows for up to 5 players to play at once and data tracking is provided for percent correct, incorrect, and assisted.

The categories of social questions asked follows the functions in the QUAD profile that are based on M.A.K Halliday's Explorations in the Functions of Language. These categories include: Requesting/Instrumental, Directing Activities/ Regulatory, Information Exchange/ Interactional, Personal, Discovery/Heuristic, and Imaginative.

Below are some examples of the type of questions that are asked. They are incredibly relevant to children's daily social routines.

 

 

Now I know what you're thinking. The student's I work with do not use an augmentative communication device device so should I buy this app? The answer is yes! Just because it's developed by PRC does not mean you cannot use it with any children working on their language or social skills.  However if you are going to use it with an augmentative communicators, this app focuses on all six stages of language development making it a great app to use. If you are interested in learning more about the six stages of language development please visit http://www.aaclanguagelab.com/.

 

 

 

 

Language Lab: Spin & Speak -Social Skills is available on the iPad for $4.99

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About this Blog


    Speaking of Apps
    Occupation: Speech-Language Pathologist
    Setting: Rehabilitation
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