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  • Dinosaur Rhotics

    An excited student (working on generalizing /r/) recently told me all about an upcoming summer blockbuster dinosaur movie. He wanted us to watch the movie trailer (and he was highly motivated to talk about the movie). We made a list of /r/ words from the film clips and our own articulation cards using index cards and markers. We highlighted where ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on May 21, 2015
  • The Culture of Definitions

    Once upon a time, not so long ago, I was testing a second-grade boy who is African-American. The student was bright and engaging, and I was beginning to wonder about the validity of the initial referral for evaluation. I was administering a comprehensive standardized language assessment. One of the subtests required the student to provide a ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on May 15, 2015
  • Maturity and Optimism

    This past week was a rough one. I was working long hours each day, and A. was having a crisis at her school. One of her good friends, E., stopped having anything to do with her. I'm still not sure what happened. As much as I can gather, other students have started a rumor that A. is, in fact, NOT autistic, and it seems like E. might believe these ...
  • Her Podcast Debut

    Recently, A. was a guest for my friend Elle’s podcast: Into It. True to the overall theme, this episode focused on one of A.’s very favorite subjects: Pokemon. I’ve mentioned Elle on this podcast before. A. is her goddaughter, and she’s been a close friend of the family for decades. I think that was part of what made A.’s presence on this podcast ...
  • Introducing the SLP Profession

    May is Better Speech and Hearing Month and a wonderful opportunity to increase awareness of every individual’s fundamental right to communication. Communication allows us to make social connections, develop emotional bonds with others, and have a sense of agency - to be active in the daily decisions of our lives. Visible markers, from a poster, ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on April 30, 2015
  • An Extraordinary Young Man

    Just when you think you are invincible the unimaginable happens. I am sad to my core. Today I got word that a beautiful young man that we have been working with has passed away. His life was cut short. This was all so unexpected and unimaginable. He was an extraordinary young man. And although we were the therapists that were supposed to be ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on April 28, 2015
  • Just Like Me

    You know how they always say that, when your children grow up into teenagers, they will be just like you? I must confess, when it comes to A., this is absolutely true. I'm blessed in a way, because I happened to be a very well-behaved teenager. I minded my mom, my grandparents, and my teachers, and I worked hard to be a good student. However, I ...
  • Fostering a Positive Environment for Meetings

    Meetings with families may occur annually, monthly or even weekly. People respond to their physical environment and to the communication styles of those around them. We can show our care and our understanding for parents/caregivers by how we arrange the materials and our interactions. The items that are on the table and within reach reflect our ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on April 24, 2015
  • Writing Messages of Hope

    A couple of weeks ago, A. started arriving home from school with various affirmations written all over her body. These affirmations proclaimed such positive thoughts as, “You are beautiful just the way you are!” and “You are loved,” and — my personal favorite — “Everyone is a composer of their own work.” The messages were written in black ink, in ...
  • Consonant Clusters with Coarticulation

    Many children with articulation disorders may have difficulty with consonant clusters (two sounds together), possibly inserting a sound such as “puh-lay” for “play”. As we produce intricately timed sequences of speech sounds, we are simultaneously completing one sound while we are preparing for the next sound. Our primary active articulators (lips ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on April 17, 2015
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