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  • Are You Ready to Order?

    A good waitress communicates, well, tells you the specials and maybe how long something will take to make. A good waitress knows her customer so well that they can remember what kinds of foods you like and maybe recommend something else around your taste buds. She remembers your name and asks how you've been and demonstrates a genuine ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on July 11, 2016
  • Cooperative Categories

    Humans may be able to remember thousands of words, but we definitely can’t always find the word we want when we want it! We may have unlimited storage for words and concepts, but we definitely have limited retrieval.We can make word recall easier through organization and categorization. When we think of with a word, we search through a large ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on July 7, 2016
  • Rainbow Fairies

    Fairies represent magic and wonder. The word “fairy” is a magic because it helps students transition from consonantal /r/ to vocalic /r/. The intervocalic /r/ in medial position allows us to produce /r/ at the end of the first syllable and the beginning of the second syllable, “fairrrr-- -rry”. We can teach the postvocalic /r/ through ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on June 29, 2016
  • Record It

    Cell phones and tablets allow for immediate audio and video recording. Students typically begin by making silly recordings of greetings and funny sayings. Since most of us are initially surprised at how our voice sounds on a recording, we watch British Radio 1 Scientist, Greg Foot’s YouTube video, “Why does your voice sound different on a ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on June 14, 2016
  • What Did You Learn This Year?

    Every school year we learn new things. I recently took a few minutes to ask each student the question, “What have you learned about your talking and your speaking this year?”Here are a few of the different responses:•    “I learned that I can do good R’s fairly consistently.”•    “I learned a different kind of R and ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on June 9, 2016
  • 'Dear Tongue...'

    “We need to write a letter to your tongue so that it will know what to do. What directions do we need to give your tongue?” The students generate directions and tips that we write on a card. A “Dear Tongue” letter for /r/ might be:“Dear Tongue,•    Remember to go to the back of the mouth•    Lift up the sides a little ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on May 31, 2016
  • Deconstructing Describing

    Let’s start with a virtual field trip to the zoo to watch the hippos eating watermelon, using multimedia. With YouTube, we can bring entertaining videos of zoo animals to therapy sessions. The hippos, with their mouths wide open awaiting a large, whole watermelon, give us a way to build our describing skills.We can start with a basic noun phrase ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on May 24, 2016
  • Articulation: Social Belonging and Safety

    How do you decide if a child needs articulation therapy? My colleague and I discussed different factors.Does it sound like the child has an accent?A mother shared with me that everyone thinks they’re from another part of the country.Their son’s articulation disorder sounds like an accent. Whenever they meet people who have met their son first, ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on May 17, 2016
  • Spelling /r/

    How do you say, “Squirrel”? Does your pronunciation truly match the spelling of “squirrel”?A bright student and I were practicing the postvocalic /r/ sound in “first”. I re-spelled the word (incorrectly) as “ferr—st” to show how it’s pronounced with an emphasis on the underlying vowel and a prolongation of the /r/. “Even though it has an ‘i’ in ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on May 4, 2016
  • Steps of Communication

    Did you ever catch your friend’s eye from across the room at a crowded event and let her know that you were ready to leave? Briefly tilting your head to the side and a quick glance toward the door can represent an entire sentence.We exchange thoughts and ideas through gestures, facial expressions, body postures, and physical ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on April 29, 2016
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