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  • New Insight into Asthma Triggers

    Could you unknowingly be aiding and abetting your patient's asthma triggers simply by labeling them as such? New research suggests that just might be the case when it comes to odor-triggered asthma. Researchers at the Monell Center have found ''that simply believing that an odor is potentially harmful can increase airway inflammation in asthmatics ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Perspective: Respiratory Views (Weblog) on July 28, 2014
  • Crowdsourcing: Funding Vs. Information

    In a recent post, I covered some unique opportunities presented by crowdfunding for technological advances in areas like molecular diagnostics. While the crowdsourcing mentality can work well in gathering funds for equipment producers, crowdsourcing medical information through sites like Wikipedia can carry more limitations and even dangers. ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Discourse: Lab (Weblog) on February 13, 2014
  • Healthcare Fraud and Abuse

      News of fraud and abuse in our healthcare system appears frequently these days. Between scams, double billing and code jamming many dollars are illegally claimed from the system. Whether it be from Medicare, Medicaid or an insurance company, one thing is certain, the honest consumers pay for it.   Just recently the Medicare Fraud ...
    Posted to COTA Thoughts (Weblog) on May 31, 2013
  • Laboratory Leadership Training

    There’s that famous saying, “Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them.” I think it can be applied to any quality, especially leadership. As a kid, I always thought it was something people were just born with in the same way that some people are just athletic and others are just funny. I think we all ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Discourse: Lab (Weblog) on March 29, 2013
  • Steady Hands

    In what has to have been one of the most fun research studies in the history of academia, 21 surgical residents had to play video games on the Nintendo Wii “for an hour a day, five days a week, for four weeks” during their residency. In an article on NPR, a group of Italian researchers fostered the project and then had the residents perform ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Discourse: Lab (Weblog) on March 1, 2013
  • Penn’s Amazing Achievements

    The ADVANCE team toured the wonderful laboratories at University of Pennsylvania/Penn Medicine last week. I wanted to help spread the word of some of their significant achievements. For example, a new treatment for leukemia, called CART 19, has proven effective in several terminally ill patients. Their findings appeared recently in the New ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Discourse: Lab (Weblog) on March 14, 2012
  • Researchers Find Gaping Hole in Quality Asthma Care

    Most children do not know how to use their inhalers correctly. Whose fault is that? Care providers. According to a new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Fewer than one in 10 children with asthma use traditional inhalers correctly. While children have more success with newer inhaler designs, at best only one child in four ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Perspective: Respiratory Views (Weblog) on April 5, 2011
  • Asthmatic Children Neglecting Their Drugs

     Respiratory therapists have their work cut out for them trying to convince their young asthma patients to take their prescribed asthma medications as ordered by the doctor. Compliance rates are dismal at less than a third of the patients overall. If ethnic factors are considered, white children have the best showing, with a third using ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Perspective: Respiratory Views (Weblog) on October 21, 2009
  • Gene Variants Factor into Asthma Attacks

    How often do therapists hear the phrase: ''It's all in the genes''?  It's used to explain everything from brainpower to muscle power and points in between. Now that same uttering might be used to apply to asthma attacks. British researchers are currently reporting youngsters carrying a gene variant called Arg 16 are more prone to attacks ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Perspective: Respiratory Views (Weblog) on October 14, 2009
  • Patients; Doctors Weigh in On LABA Risk

     A panel of 30 medical and scientific Food and Drug Administration advisors plans to vote today on whether the safety risks posed by long acting beta agonists outweigh the benefits to respiratory patients. But professional and patient organizations across the country have already weighed in today in support of keeping the medications on the ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Perspective: Respiratory Views (Weblog) on December 11, 2008
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