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  • Eat Breakfast, Work Smarter

    We employed a temp doctor who loved terrible breakfasts. During rounds we would stop by the dictation room to update her on cultures and other issues, and she listened while inhaling a fast food breakfast sausage muffin egg and cheese thing wrapped in a baby space blanket. I can smell it as I write about it. Lab techs aren’t any better, ...
    Posted to Stepwise Success (Weblog) on February 5, 2014
  • Is Your Hospital Secure?

    The recent tragedy in Connecticut has spurred debate on topics related to public safety, which is good. Our most vulnerable citizens need protection. This includes children, the elderly and infirm, and patients in hospitals. That list includes healthcare workers, too. According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health ...
    Posted to Stepwise Success (Weblog) on December 21, 2012
  • Are 12-Hour Shifts Safe?

    When nurses switch to 12-hour shifts, I wonder if back injury claims increase. Nurses and nurse assistants literally do the heavy lifting in hospitals, and patients aren’t getting smaller. Forcing fifty- and sixty-something people with a lifetime of cumulative spinal stress to lift an extra four hours a day seems foolhardy. The question was ...
    Posted to Stepwise Success (Weblog) on December 5, 2011
  • Contagion: A Nice Nod to the Lab Community

    I just saw the blockbuster movie Contagion and must say I was pretty impressed. When I watch a medical-themed movie, I always look at it with a critical eye. How factual is it? Is it authentic in terms of scenarios, equipment, procedures and vocabulary?I look for how realistically roles are portrayed. For example I tend to roll my eyes and become ...
  • Our Noise Problem

    If you go to “Hospital Compare,” a site maintained by the US Department of Health and Human Services summarizing the HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) scores, you can find out how quiet the hospitals in your area are, among other things. Patients who report the area around their room is “always” quiet at ...
    Posted to Stepwise Success (Weblog) on September 2, 2011
  • Obesity

    A large patient arrives at the laboratory after hours to have blood drawn. She slowly follows the only tech on duty down a short hallway and around a corner to a phlebotomy area. The tech hesitates as the patient studies a narrow drawing chair. She turns and wedges herself in the chair with some effort. The tech struggles with the tourniquet, ...
    Posted to Stepwise Success (Weblog) on August 13, 2010
  • The Beat Goes on at Organ Donor Programs

    National Donate Life Month came to a close last week with 107,267 people left on the waiting list for life-saving organ transplants. Few respiratory therapists work directly for transplant programs; however, their patients may include those awaiting transplants or those who are in a critical care or trauma unit and could likely end up on a donor ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Perspective: Respiratory Views (Weblog) on May 4, 2010
  • Dispose of Unused Drugs in Environmentally Safe Manner

    Until recently, I have not paid much attention to the proper way to dispose of unused medications. And if your household is like mine, you probably have lots of vials of unneeded drugs in your medicine cabinet. Amidst recent media articles detailing dangers of improperly discarded drugs, I did a survey of our home medicine chest and was more ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Perspective: Respiratory Views (Weblog) on January 27, 2010
  • Smiths Medical Issues Nationwide Voluntary Recall

    Smiths Medical and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration notified health care professionals about a nationwide voluntary recall of Portex Uncuffed Pediatric-Sized Tracheal Tubes (sizes 2.5, 3.0 and 3.5 mm). A small number of tubes were manufactured with internal diameters slightly smaller than indicated on the labeling, which may create the ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Perspective: Respiratory Views (Weblog) on September 16, 2009
  • Face Masks: To Wear or Not to Wear?

    Wearing a face mask may increase your chances of avoiding the flu by 400 percent, according to a recent Australian study. During the winters of 2006 and 2007, researchers at the University of New South Wales observed more than 280 adults from 143 families in Sydney. Adults who wore face masks were four times more likely than those who didn't to ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Perspective: Respiratory Views (Weblog) on January 30, 2009
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