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Showing page 1 of 7 (66 total posts)
  • Visual Dermatology Clinic: Nation's Largest Free Health Clinic

    Last week I was fortunate enough to participate in my fourth CareHarborLA event. The CareHarbor free clinic is held annually in the fall at the Los Angeles Sports Arena. This four day event is offered to the uninsured, underinsured and at risk populations in need of medical care. Medical consultations and exams, specialty care, mammograms, ...
    Posted to Dermatology Practice Today (Weblog) on September 19, 2014
  • Gaining Independence

    For the past couple weeks, I have been catching myself in the middle of an encounter and realizing, ''Wow, I know what I'm going to do for this patient.'' I tell them their diagnosis, call in their scripts and make a solid follow-up plan. I walk out of the exam room and wonder, ''So is this what being a PA feels like?'' Maybe, but then ten ...
    Posted to First Year PA (Weblog) on September 15, 2014
  • Coordinating Care

    During your first few months as a PA, you really are trying to take it all in: sponge away as much knowledge as you can, form good habits (like never getting sloppy on the physical exam) and develop a style that will carry you through forty years down the road. It's daunting. Primary care is a crunch and though the PAs are programmed to ‘spend ...
    Posted to First Year PA (Weblog) on September 2, 2014
  • Dealing with Discouraged Patients

    You're scanning the EMR and you see four office visits in the past month with the same chief complaint. You walk in the room knowing it's not going to be an average cut-and-dry visit. The patient is frustrated about their bowel, their bladder or their other non-emergent complaint that keeps driving them back to the office, and you have to address ...
    Posted to First Year PA (Weblog) on August 4, 2014
  • How to Avoid Absolute Frustration

    Primary care is so imperfect. Each day I could probably find as many things to complain about as complaints my patients come in with, and I am beginning to see why burnout can occur. That is, if you don't have the right perspective. As I forge ahead on this year-one journey, I am creating tenets to avoid burnout. I'm honestly not a huge ...
    Posted to First Year PA (Weblog) on July 21, 2014
  • Until We Meet Again

    I sat in the airport terminal in November of 2012 and stared at my cell phone. I flicked the screen on and off as I waited out another wave of anxiety. I was about to place a call that would dictate the course of my life. At the time, I could barely comprehend the changes that would take place over the next year. It would be the year that ...
    Posted to First Year PA (Weblog) on January 9, 2014
  • The Secret of Death

    I'm too young for this. That's what everyone says-or at least thinks, the way their eyes track across my features, down to the name on my coat, then back to my face. It's OK. I tell myself that I can earn the respect automatically granted to someone with a few gray hairs. Besides, there's a difference between age and maturity and these days I ...
    Posted to First Year PA (Weblog) on December 17, 2013
  • The Quarterly Check-Up: Part 3

    We have carved deep into the second half of my first year as a professional physician assistant. This is the perfect time for a Quarterly Check-Up to examine some of the biggest lessons over the last three months We learned that our patient's beliefs can trump the strongest medicine and that our acceptance of those beliefs makes us better ...
    Posted to First Year PA (Weblog) on October 3, 2013
  • The Lessons Never Taught

    I remember all of my great preceptors: The ones who reaffirmed my choice of career or mentored my special projects or were less of a taskmaster and more of a friend. As a student, I pictured myself in their position, guiding some wide-eyed student through the treacherous surf of clinical rotations. I imagined that sage, professorial Harrison ...
    Posted to First Year PA (Weblog) on September 19, 2013
  • The Don’ts of Cryosurgery

    Cryosurgery is a process where liquid nitrogen is applied to a lesion to induce cell death. It is a procedure done every day in dermatology offices and is now done routinely in primary care offices as well. It is a relatively low-risk procedure, causes minimal scarring and can be used for a multitude of conditions, including actinic ...
    Posted to Dermatology Practice Today (Weblog) on August 9, 2013
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