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  • Sam's Gift

    As a pediatric intensive care nurse, I dreaded the holidays because tragedies were even more poignant and painful due to the time of the year. This one particular Christmas proved me wrong—not because of the lack of human loss but because of the greatness of the human spirit.  I first met Sam when the lab called in a panic about her ...
    Posted to On Call: Leadership in Nursing (Weblog) on December 1, 2016
  • MacGyver Nurses Among Us

    I cannot remember the first time I heard the term ''MacGyver Nurse.''  For those of you that do not remember watching MacGyver, the show is back. The main character could settle any crisis, it seemed, from world war, invasions of aliens, or out-of-control spaceships with duct tape, his Swiss pocket knife, and gum.  Okay, I ...
    Posted to On Call: Leadership in Nursing (Weblog) on November 17, 2016
  • An Exceptional Mantra for Nurses

    I'm not sure when exactly it starts, but I DO know that across the board nurses are very similar in one personality trait. We're universally hard on ourselves while being, inversely, very forgiving of others. We set our own bar unbelievably high. This unfortunate habit may kick in shortly after we articulate the Florence Nightingale pledge—when ...
    Posted to The Nurse Card (Weblog) on October 12, 2016
  • Small Talk Can be a Big Deal

    There are so many instances where small talk is practiced regularly in the various nursing units. Small talk is unescapable: in the elevator, in the lobby, in the café... everywhere. The real benefit to small talk isn't what's said; it's when relationships are built over time. If your shift starts at 0700, then chances are you are going to see ...
    Posted to RN Men: The XY Viewpoint (Weblog) on October 7, 2016
  • The Infamous Colonoscopy: Tips for Prepping

    A colonoscopy: At some point in our lives, we all will have one, either because we have reached the screening age of 50 or because we are having issues with our GI tract. Having undergone my colonoscopy and being under the age of 50, with having a strong family history of colon cancer, I too was dreading the evil prep. Going through the ...
  • When is Suffering Senseless?

    Oncology nurses provide care to cancer patients and their families across the continuum. They are there from the life-changing moment of diagnosis to the frightening, yet hopeful, treatment phase. Such treatments may make patients feel worse than they did before treatment, causing nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, hair loss, fatigue, loss of appetite, ...
    Posted to Guarding the Nursing Profession (Weblog) on September 23, 2016
  • When the Personal and Professional Realms Collide

    There is an interesting perspective a nurse (or a nurse's loved one) who is a patient has. First off, it's not easy to be a patient-it's especially not easy to be one when you are a nurse. It's even more difficult when you teach nurses how to take care of others as there are certain expectations of care that should be provided. So, naturally, when ...
    Posted to RN Men: The XY Viewpoint (Weblog) on August 12, 2016
  • Going Off Script

    By virtue of a chronic illness, I have a dual perspective on healthcare. As an occasional patient, I am able to more closely understand both the provider and the utilization side of care. As a result of my experience, I have learned that bedside communication can be enlightening, perhaps representing a barometer of how a particular institution may ...
    Posted to The Nurse Card (Weblog) on July 25, 2016
  • The Cost of Caring

    Suddenly there it was—a lack of compassion. Or was it? She was only 29-years-old when the phone rang with news no one wants to hear. She didn't believe it at first, and neither did her family. Then it became reality-more doctor appointments and finally surgery scheduled for a double mastectomy. She had ductal carcinoma, highly aggressive, but ...
    Posted to On Call: Leadership in Nursing (Weblog) on July 19, 2016
  • Boundaries of Care

    As new nurses, we manage our careers carefully, knowing we might get attached to patients and families easily. Policy and procedure manuals warn us about boundaries. We know not to spend time with patients or families other than in our professional status. We follow those rules to the letter. We don't want to form relationships with patients where ...
    Posted to The Nurse Card (Weblog) on June 10, 2016
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