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  • Moving Forward After Loss

    Nurses deal with sorrow and loss on a frequent basis, so much so that it becomes an occupational hazard for some specialties. Yet we never quite get used to the feeling. Whether professionally or personally, grief can feel staggeringly overwhelming. It can encompass us in a way that makes it nearly impossible to move forward or to ...
    Posted to The Nurse Card (Weblog) on January 26, 2017
  • Mean Nurses, Where are Your Manners?

    Every day in our nursing career we meet a lot of diverse types of people. But handling different types of nurses at work can be a dismaying task. It can be very challenging working with lazy, difficult coworkers who don't pull their weight. If you have been in this profession for any length of time (22 years for me), you know who I am talking ...
  • Sam's Gift

    As a pediatric intensive care nurse, I dreaded the holidays because tragedies were even more poignant and painful due to the time of the year. This one particular Christmas proved me wrong—not because of the lack of human loss but because of the greatness of the human spirit.  I first met Sam when the lab called in a panic about her ...
    Posted to On Call: Leadership in Nursing (Weblog) on December 1, 2016
  • MacGyver Nurses Among Us

    I cannot remember the first time I heard the term ''MacGyver Nurse.''  For those of you that do not remember watching MacGyver, the show is back. The main character could settle any crisis, it seemed, from world war, invasions of aliens, or out-of-control spaceships with duct tape, his Swiss pocket knife, and gum.  Okay, I ...
    Posted to On Call: Leadership in Nursing (Weblog) on November 17, 2016
  • When the Personal and Professional Realms Collide

    There is an interesting perspective a nurse (or a nurse's loved one) who is a patient has. First off, it's not easy to be a patient-it's especially not easy to be one when you are a nurse. It's even more difficult when you teach nurses how to take care of others as there are certain expectations of care that should be provided. So, naturally, when ...
    Posted to RN Men: The XY Viewpoint (Weblog) on August 12, 2016
  • The Bitter Team

    Every place I ever worked as a nurse/manager, there is always someone on staff that erodes morale, the employees who repeatedly slack off, talk back, or fail to complete tasks on time. Let's face it: we have all encountered this at some point in our career; the issue is how to handle this. When an employee starts to lose respect, your authority ...
  • The Cost of Caring

    Suddenly there it was—a lack of compassion. Or was it? She was only 29-years-old when the phone rang with news no one wants to hear. She didn't believe it at first, and neither did her family. Then it became reality-more doctor appointments and finally surgery scheduled for a double mastectomy. She had ductal carcinoma, highly aggressive, but ...
    Posted to On Call: Leadership in Nursing (Weblog) on July 19, 2016
  • Boundaries of Care

    As new nurses, we manage our careers carefully, knowing we might get attached to patients and families easily. Policy and procedure manuals warn us about boundaries. We know not to spend time with patients or families other than in our professional status. We follow those rules to the letter. We don't want to form relationships with patients where ...
    Posted to The Nurse Card (Weblog) on June 10, 2016
  • Charmed, I'm Sure

    We live in one of the more volatile times for nursing, whether it is through aggressive political discussions, or the rising violence in cities across the country. Each day brings additional concerns, whether it is the latest statistics on the spread of Zika through pregnant Moms in the U.S., or the latest city/shooting/potential spread of ...
    Posted to The Nurse Card (Weblog) on May 22, 2016
  • Individualism and Minimalism: Cultural Philosophies and their Impact on Nursing Teamwork

    Two of the guiding principles in modern American culture today can have a devastating impact the success of nursing teams and their ability to provide safe, effective care if we overlook them. The two philosophies are individualism and minimalism which lead to the attitudes ''What's in it for me?'' and ''What is the least I have to do to get by?'' ...
    Posted to Guarding the Nursing Profession (Weblog) on May 9, 2016
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