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  • Visual Dermatology Clinic: Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    These photos belong to an 80-year-old female who presented to our clinic for a total body skin screening. She has a history of Basal Cell Carcinoma on her forehead that was treated with MOHS in 2011. All of these photos shown are positive for Squamous Cell Carcinoma. Additionally, this patient has two more SCC's not shown. (Hover your ...
    Posted to Dermatology Practice Today (Weblog) on July 24, 2014
  • An Effective Option for Melasma

    Frequently, women present to our clinic with melasma. Patches of dark pigmentation that often present symmetrically on the cheeks, upper lip and/or forehead characterize melasma. Excessive melanin production is stimulated by excessive sun exposure, heat or hormonal changes. The onset of melasma is often associated with hormonal shifts such as use ...
    Posted to Aesthetics Practice Today (Weblog) on June 4, 2014
  • A Sample Dermatology Protocol

      Many nurse practitioners have asked me about dermatology protocols. They are no different from other protocols and should be an outline of your practice agreement with your supervising or collaborating physician. These protocols should remain broad and general, but list important and specific aspects of your practice like prescribing ...
    Posted to Dermatology Practice Today (Weblog) on April 14, 2014
  • The Quarterly Check-Up: Part 3

    We have carved deep into the second half of my first year as a professional physician assistant. This is the perfect time for a Quarterly Check-Up to examine some of the biggest lessons over the last three months We learned that our patient's beliefs can trump the strongest medicine and that our acceptance of those beliefs makes us better ...
    Posted to First Year PA (Weblog) on October 3, 2013
  • The Don’ts of Cryosurgery

    Cryosurgery is a process where liquid nitrogen is applied to a lesion to induce cell death. It is a procedure done every day in dermatology offices and is now done routinely in primary care offices as well. It is a relatively low-risk procedure, causes minimal scarring and can be used for a multitude of conditions, including actinic ...
    Posted to Dermatology Practice Today (Weblog) on August 9, 2013
  • Treating Acne: The Basics

    As the summer comes to a close and students and parents begin to plan for the next school year, inevitably there is a mad dash to the dermatology office to treat acne. Freshmen want to be clear to start high school, seniors want to be pimple-free for senior pictures. The problem is that they like to wait until 2 weeks before the start of school to ...
    Posted to Dermatology Practice Today (Weblog) on July 12, 2013
  • Always a Student

    Since graduation, I've had plenty of reminders - good and bad - that I am no longer a student. There is the ''PA-C'' behind my name and my shiny new state license. A paycheck arrives every two weeks like an airplane dropping supplies on a desert island. And, of course, I now hold myself to an even higher professional standard. While these ...
    Posted to First Year PA (Weblog) on April 18, 2013
  • Become the Eight Percent

    Was it losing weight? Spending more time with your family? Dragging your body to the gym? Reading more books? When's the last year you set a new year's resolution? And how far did you get before you broke it? And why are you so discouraged about trying again in 2013? We students in the medical field are required to study behavior change ...
    Posted to NP & PA Student Blog (Weblog) on December 27, 2012
  • My Four Favorite Derm Cases

      1. A patient presents with a new spot on the nose for 3 months. No history of skin cancer. I believe it's a BCC and path proves it's a SCC, WOW! 2. Ceruloderma, a drug-induced pigmentation secondary to Lupus medication.   3. ''Show and Tell:'' I love a zip lock bag attached to the chart on the door. This patient was proud of the ...
    Posted to Dermatology Practice Today (Weblog) on November 15, 2012
  • Treatment of Ochronosis

    A patient presents with discrete patches of hyperpigmentation on the face, particularly involving the cheeks and upper lip. She denies recent sun exposure or use of oral contraception pills. She was diagnosed a year ago with melasma and given hydroquinone, which she used as directed in the evening for three months. She now ...
    Posted to Aesthetics Practice Today (Weblog) on October 23, 2012
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