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  • Finding the Problem: Avoiding the Misguided Search

    One of the buzzwords in long-term care is looking for the ''root-cause'' for various problems that arise. Many of these ''root-cause'' searches are often based on resident care. Others are often facility-based, especially related to financial information, staffing, and general supplies and facility maintenance. However, many of ...
    Posted to Gerotalk (Weblog) on October 30, 2014
  • Can Jellyfish Hold the Secret to the Fountain of Youth?

    The fountain of youth and eternal life has been something that has been sought and spoken about for a number of years. We still often hear the term, ''anti-aging'' used in reference to various types of supplements that are frequently advertised, as if using these supposed products will reverse aging or prevent any further aging in the ...
    Posted to Gerotalk (Weblog) on October 22, 2014
  • Researchers Prove the Role and Value of Simulation in Nursing Education

    The National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) released in August 2014 the findings of its research, ''The NCSBN National Simulation Study: A Longitudinal, Randomized, Controlled Study Replacing Clinical Hours with Simulation in Pre-licensure Nursing Education.'' The core finding: When nursing educators substitute high-quality ...
  • IG# and Sepsis

    Our current hematology analyzer was a big step up from a Sysmex K4500 with a 3-part differential to a Sysmex XT-1800i with a 5-part differential. I remember arranging a conference call between the bean counters and the pathologist to explain why the difference was important. Since then we have successfully eliminated percentage differential ...
    Posted to Stepwise Success (Weblog) on October 10, 2014
  • What’s Your Lab Doing about IQCP?

    Why do we run quality control in the laboratory? The simple, obvious answer is to ensure that the entire test system working together is able to produce reliable results. The rub lies in the concept of reliability. So we run QC based on manufacturer’s directives. But how does the manufacturer come up with its recommendations for a kit, set of ...
  • ICD-10: Ready, Set, Code

    [Editor's note: the following blog post was written by Bonnie Cassidy, senior director of health information management (HIM) innovation for Nuance.]  Much has been said about the politics and jockeying of groups behind the scenes, lobbying either for or against ICD-10. That's not going to change. Healthcare providers must be proactive ...
    Posted to The Politics of Health Care (Weblog) on October 2, 2014
  • More Sample Lookback

    In 2011 I blogged about using a binary search algorithm to find a point of failure when performing a sample lookback with a large number of samples. In dealing with sample lookback and revising our own policies since then, we’ve hit a few snags: How should we account for other instrument variables e.g. scheduled maintenance? How should we ...
    Posted to Stepwise Success (Weblog) on October 1, 2014
  • Virtual Keystrokes

    In my last blog I said computers are stupidly reliable. They do whatever they are told, over and over. And they don’t get bored or make mistakes. It’s easy, for example, to create little programs that send keystrokes to applications. I use a freeware program called AutoIt for Windows (there are others, such as AutoHotkey) to create simple and ...
    Posted to Stepwise Success (Weblog) on September 26, 2014
  • Computers are Stupid

    Back in the day we imagined computers were smart. In a 1964 Twilight Zone episode called “The Brain Center at Whipples,” a CEO who heartlessly replaces workers with robots is himself replaced by Robby The Robot from the 1956 classic Forbidden Planet. Capek to H.A.L. to Nomad to Tron’s Master Control -- science fiction is a junkyard of them -- ...
    Posted to Stepwise Success (Weblog) on September 22, 2014
  • Gamification in Healthcare

    Video games aren't just for kids anymore. The earliest gaming consoles kept players stationary and sedentary, and became an object of concern in a world of rising obesity rates, diabetes and other health scares. But then came games that required players to move - to participate with their physical bodies. That opened up a whole new world ...
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