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  • Articulation Therapy: Inner Voice Recordings

    I've had orthodontia for most of my life and still wear a retainer at night. When I was in grade school, I had a palate expander to change the shape of my mouth. A strong wire was connected to the back molars that exerted pressure on the hard palate. This was some time ago, when only an orthodontist could adjust a palate expander. I had periodic ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on January 12, 2017
  • Understanding Passive Sentences

    While assessing a middle school student for the presence/absence of a language disorder, I asked the student the following question, “Jan saw Pedro. Dwayne saw Frances. Who was seen?” The student did not respond correctly to this trial item and benefited from repetition and modeling.  To answer the question correctly, you need to understand ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on October 3, 2016
  • Describing Dialect

    “Do you think that the student’s responses are affected by dialect?” I asked my colleague. We were discussing a student’s performance on a subtest that required generating original sentences given a picture and a stimulus word.“What dialect?” she countered, “Trailer Park?”After a momentary pause, I said, “I was thinking rural or mountain ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on September 25, 2015
  • Interrupting the Monologue

    Many people are enthusiastic communicators who love to share stories and talk about their hobbies and interests. I once worked with an 11-year-old boy who was creative, engaging, and entertaining. He had specialized interests and advanced skills in engineering. He loved to talk about his latest inventions – in a long, detailed, running ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on July 9, 2015
  • Window into Stuttering

    As clinicians, many of us do not have a societally recognized form of disability. We have the privilege of able-ness. Our work ensures daily contact with individuals who may be identified by society and/or may self-identify as individuals with a disability.  Even though providing therapeutic services is our calling, we are still only able ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on June 25, 2015
  • Speaking and Being Heard

    In the early days of my career, I apprenticed with a clinician who specialized in Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC). She was highly skilled and in tune with her clients, who used forms of AAC to communicate. One day, a young girl arrived for her therapy appointment. The girl wore ankle/foot orthotics on both legs and had a stilted ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on June 18, 2015
  • The Study of Strengths

    As speech language pathologists, we are highly trained at observing and listening. We recognize and identify client productions that deviate from normative targets. We listen for errors and sort errors by type, degree, and frequency to plan remediation. Our testing methods enable us to pinpoint specific areas of difficulty and design intervention ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on May 29, 2015
  • Introducing the SLP Profession

    May is Better Speech and Hearing Month and a wonderful opportunity to increase awareness of every individual’s fundamental right to communication. Communication allows us to make social connections, develop emotional bonds with others, and have a sense of agency - to be active in the daily decisions of our lives. Visible markers, from a poster, ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on April 30, 2015
  • Consonant Clusters with Coarticulation

    Many children with articulation disorders may have difficulty with consonant clusters (two sounds together), possibly inserting a sound such as “puh-lay” for “play”. As we produce intricately timed sequences of speech sounds, we are simultaneously completing one sound while we are preparing for the next sound. Our primary active articulators (lips ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on April 17, 2015
  • White/Gold vs. Blue/Black Dress

    Millions of people on social media and later mainstream media recently viewed a photo of a particular dress that stirred a national debate. Due to the background lighting and photographic exposure, people saw the two colors of the dress differently. For all of us who debated the colors of that dress (blue/black or white/gold), we had a ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on March 4, 2015
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