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  • Looking at Language Samples

    A colleague asked about ways to analyze a language sample:Consider cultural and linguistic factors: dialect/language differences, linguistic community, etc.Highlight conjunctions: compare compound and complex sentences•    Coordinating conjunctions: and, but, or, etc.•    Subordinating conjunctions: before/after, ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on December 7, 2015
  • Demographic Meanings

    “My caseload is really diverse. About 25% of the students are African-American, 25% are Hispanic, 25% are Asian, and the rest are American.”One of my colleagues offered this description of her caseload at a social event attended by other clinicians and university faculty. Did you notice anything interesting about the above statement? Perhaps you ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on July 16, 2015
  • First Class Clinicians

    Last week I met a skilled clinician who had recently relocated, transitioning from running a private practice in an urban environment to working in a rural school district. After our conversation, she shared the following sentiment: “I was encouraged by your own strong feelings that school-based clinicians aren't second class therapists and ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on July 3, 2015
  • White/Gold vs. Blue/Black Dress

    Millions of people on social media and later mainstream media recently viewed a photo of a particular dress that stirred a national debate. Due to the background lighting and photographic exposure, people saw the two colors of the dress differently. For all of us who debated the colors of that dress (blue/black or white/gold), we had a ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on March 4, 2015
  • Compensatory Articulation for /r/

    Compensatory articulation means that we can produce a sound in more than one way. We can use different configurations of our tongue, jaw, lips, etc. to form a target sound. This target sound is perceived to be the same sound by a listener regardless of which mouth posture we are using. Compensatory articulation guides /r/ production. In the ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on February 23, 2015