Welcome to Health Care POV | sign in | join
in Search

BROWSE BY TAGS

All Tags » early intervent... » therapeutic experiences
Showing page 1 of 16 (155 total posts)
  • The Gift of Being an Anxious New Mom

    I feel very fortunate to have battled my own bouts of anxiety and the baby blues with the birth of one of my own children. When I was suffering of this debilitating battle, I would wonder why? Why me? It's hard enough being a new mother of a baby that needs me 24/7, she cries, she poops—she never takes a break! Why, on top of all of that, ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on March 5, 2015
  • White/Gold vs. Blue/Black Dress

    Millions of people on social media and later mainstream media recently viewed a photo of a particular dress that stirred a national debate. Due to the background lighting and photographic exposure, people saw the two colors of the dress differently. For all of us who debated the colors of that dress (blue/black or white/gold), we had a ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on March 4, 2015
  • Things I Want Every Patient & Family to Know

    One of the joys of writing this blog over the past year has been the ability to share my perspective on family and patient interaction. Of course, it has been focused on my passion of giving the non-verbal a voice. So today I would like to talk specifically to those families and users that I hope to get more SLPs to serve. Here are the ...
    Posted to Speech Therapy: The ABCs of AAC (Weblog) on February 25, 2015
  • Compensatory Articulation for /r/

    Compensatory articulation means that we can produce a sound in more than one way. We can use different configurations of our tongue, jaw, lips, etc. to form a target sound. This target sound is perceived to be the same sound by a listener regardless of which mouth posture we are using. Compensatory articulation guides /r/ production. In the ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on February 23, 2015
  • Vowel /r/: Starting with the Vowel

    Vowel /r/ distortions are common and often challenging to remediate. We may benefit from starting with the underlying vowel and then re-introducing the /r/. In the United States, we generally have a rhotic /r/, where the vowel is “colored” (changed) by the /r/. Many children recognize this change in the state of the vowel, and when they ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on February 16, 2015
  • Child-Led vs. Adult-Led Therapy

    I think all of us in some way have a style to our therapy that prefers one or the other. I have made it my own challenge to be able to do both: the reason being that there should not just be one type of approach for all children. I feel like some kids thrive and respond better when they feel like they can lead the play in a session. Other ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on February 16, 2015
  • Overcoming Device Use Hurdles

    Each time that I help a user get a device I am filled with hope. It is an exhilarating day, thinking about the possibilities that are there for communication. Often though, there are hurdles that interfere with device use, which means we have someone unable to communicate wants and needs. This affects safety, ability to socialize and ...
    Posted to Speech Therapy: The ABCs of AAC (Weblog) on February 11, 2015
  • Ideas: The Power of Sharing

    Each time we work with a client, we are learning about successful intervention and so are our clients. When a target is met, a good idea has been implemented – and when we share credit for these ideas, everyone blooms. Developing a generous and giving mindset toward ideas and reducing instinctive proprietary reactions, may help us to empower ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on February 11, 2015
  • Learning with Small Steps

    When I was in middle school, I liked running and signed up for track team. When we met with the coach, she pointed to a far away water tower that was a tiny speck in the distance. “At the end of the season, you will be running to the water tower and back,” she announced.  I could barely see the water tower, and I did not ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on February 3, 2015
  • Questions about Communication Device Use in Treatment

    As an SLP who helps treat and train those with communication devices, I get lots of questions about device use. Sometimes families tell me that the therapist or teacher that works with the user “does not want to use the device until they are trained.” In some ways this seems reasonable, technology is really scary, but to me who deals with it ...
    Posted to Speech Therapy: The ABCs of AAC (Weblog) on February 3, 2015
1 2 3 4 5 Next > ... Last »