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Showing page 1 of 4 (35 total posts)
  • Dear Future Leader

    Last week you told me about a recent leadership meeting: participants, proposed initiatives, attempted negotiations, and post-meeting allegiances. I didn’t hear what you needed, but I should have. I tried to dissuade you from higher-level politics. I don’t know if I felt jaded, or if I was trying to protect you. I care about you a lot. I don’t ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on November 6, 2015
  • Keep Calm and Stay Optimistic

    As speech-Language professionals many of us face struggles every day as we meet and work with those new and challenging clients.  Whether it’s finding and practicing new therapy strategies to help our clients reach their target goals or identifying additional needs as they arise.  We all face them and most of us every day.  What ...
    Posted to The Voice of the SLP Assistant (Weblog) on October 28, 2015
  • Involving Parents in Early Intervention

    At our agency, we firmly believe in working alongside the parent and family to address speech and language delays in young children. We provide speech and language services in homes, parks, and day cares if that is the normal routine location that the family participates in. It would be a rare occasion if we were to exclude the parent or have the ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on July 28, 2015
  • Question Parents Carefully

    There are many test tools on the market to use with young children. I think it is important to understand the information that each of these tools can yield and that testing should contain a play component, a parental report component, and a standardized testing component whenever possible. There are parent questionnaires and tools that rely ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on July 16, 2015
  • Administering Tests to Toddlers

    “Are you kidding?” I chuckled to myself at the thought of the title of this blog entry. In grad school, I actually thought that you evaluated a toddler's speech and language skills by breaking out a standardized testing tool and you administered the test and that was that. Well, that sounds fabulous, but let me tell you all of the things that ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on July 7, 2015
  • First Class Clinicians

    Last week I met a skilled clinician who had recently relocated, transitioning from running a private practice in an urban environment to working in a rural school district. After our conversation, she shared the following sentiment: “I was encouraged by your own strong feelings that school-based clinicians aren't second class therapists and ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on July 3, 2015
  • Your Child and AAC: One Mother’s Tips for Success

    Elizabeth Kenkel is a 21-year-old young woman with Moebius Syndrome and cerebral palsy who no longer has to rely on anyone to share her ideas, thoughts and feelings thanks to her speech-generating augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) device. Her mother, Sandra Kenkel, shares the following tips for other parents of children using ...
    Posted to Speech and Hearing Perspectives (Weblog) on June 30, 2015
  • Safety in Silliness

    It may take a great deal of bravery to try something new – something that you don’t know how to do, something that feels foreign or strange. When we ask our clients to produce sounds in different ways, we are asking them to experience unfamiliar motor movements. When we shape progressive approximations of targets, we ask our clients to make ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on June 5, 2015
  • Verb Choices and Learning Opportunities

    Our daily lives are filled with a combination of both obligations and opportunities. Sometimes we may even have difficulty distinguishing between the two. Having the chance to work hard, to push oneself to accomplish tasks, and to learn new things is an opportunity. Access to education is not universal – learning is in many ways still a ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on March 27, 2015
  • The Gift of Being an Anxious New Mom

    I feel very fortunate to have battled my own bouts of anxiety and the baby blues with the birth of one of my own children. When I was suffering of this debilitating battle, I would wonder why? Why me? It's hard enough being a new mother of a baby that needs me 24/7, she cries, she poops—she never takes a break! Why, on top of all of that, ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on March 5, 2015
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