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Showing page 1 of 5 (48 total posts)
  • Involving Parents in Early Intervention

    At our agency, we firmly believe in working alongside the parent and family to address speech and language delays in young children. We provide speech and language services in homes, parks, and day cares if that is the normal routine location that the family participates in. It would be a rare occasion if we were to exclude the parent or have the ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on July 28, 2015
  • Demographic Meanings

    “My caseload is really diverse. About 25% of the students are African-American, 25% are Hispanic, 25% are Asian, and the rest are American.”One of my colleagues offered this description of her caseload at a social event attended by other clinicians and university faculty. Did you notice anything interesting about the above statement? Perhaps you ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on July 16, 2015
  • Question Parents Carefully

    There are many test tools on the market to use with young children. I think it is important to understand the information that each of these tools can yield and that testing should contain a play component, a parental report component, and a standardized testing component whenever possible. There are parent questionnaires and tools that rely ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on July 16, 2015
  • Administering Tests to Toddlers

    “Are you kidding?” I chuckled to myself at the thought of the title of this blog entry. In grad school, I actually thought that you evaluated a toddler's speech and language skills by breaking out a standardized testing tool and you administered the test and that was that. Well, that sounds fabulous, but let me tell you all of the things that ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on July 7, 2015
  • First Class Clinicians

    Last week I met a skilled clinician who had recently relocated, transitioning from running a private practice in an urban environment to working in a rural school district. After our conversation, she shared the following sentiment: “I was encouraged by your own strong feelings that school-based clinicians aren't second class therapists and ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on July 3, 2015
  • Window into Stuttering

    As clinicians, many of us do not have a societally recognized form of disability. We have the privilege of able-ness. Our work ensures daily contact with individuals who may be identified by society and/or may self-identify as individuals with a disability.  Even though providing therapeutic services is our calling, we are still only able ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on June 25, 2015
  • Every Mouth is Special

    Early in my career, I was completing what I expected to be a routine oral mechanism examination for a shy girl in the 4th grade. She opened her mouth wide and I shined my flashlight into her mouth. She had two complete sets of teeth, side-by-side – like a shark’s mouth. I was shocked. I had never seen anything like that, nor imagined that children ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on May 8, 2015
  • Verb Choices and Learning Opportunities

    Our daily lives are filled with a combination of both obligations and opportunities. Sometimes we may even have difficulty distinguishing between the two. Having the chance to work hard, to push oneself to accomplish tasks, and to learn new things is an opportunity. Access to education is not universal – learning is in many ways still a ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on March 27, 2015
  • The Gift of Being an Anxious New Mom

    I feel very fortunate to have battled my own bouts of anxiety and the baby blues with the birth of one of my own children. When I was suffering of this debilitating battle, I would wonder why? Why me? It's hard enough being a new mother of a baby that needs me 24/7, she cries, she poops—she never takes a break! Why, on top of all of that, ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on March 5, 2015
  • Overcoming Device Use Hurdles

    Each time that I help a user get a device I am filled with hope. It is an exhilarating day, thinking about the possibilities that are there for communication. Often though, there are hurdles that interfere with device use, which means we have someone unable to communicate wants and needs. This affects safety, ability to socialize and ...
    Posted to Speech Therapy: The ABCs of AAC (Weblog) on February 11, 2015
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