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  • Demographic Meanings

    “My caseload is really diverse. About 25% of the students are African-American, 25% are Hispanic, 25% are Asian, and the rest are American.”One of my colleagues offered this description of her caseload at a social event attended by other clinicians and university faculty. Did you notice anything interesting about the above statement? Perhaps you ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on July 16, 2015
  • First Class Clinicians

    Last week I met a skilled clinician who had recently relocated, transitioning from running a private practice in an urban environment to working in a rural school district. After our conversation, she shared the following sentiment: “I was encouraged by your own strong feelings that school-based clinicians aren't second class therapists and ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on July 3, 2015
  • Speaking and Being Heard

    In the early days of my career, I apprenticed with a clinician who specialized in Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC). She was highly skilled and in tune with her clients, who used forms of AAC to communicate. One day, a young girl arrived for her therapy appointment. The girl wore ankle/foot orthotics on both legs and had a stilted ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on June 18, 2015
  • White/Gold vs. Blue/Black Dress

    Millions of people on social media and later mainstream media recently viewed a photo of a particular dress that stirred a national debate. Due to the background lighting and photographic exposure, people saw the two colors of the dress differently. For all of us who debated the colors of that dress (blue/black or white/gold), we had a ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on March 4, 2015
  • Compensatory Articulation for /r/

    Compensatory articulation means that we can produce a sound in more than one way. We can use different configurations of our tongue, jaw, lips, etc. to form a target sound. This target sound is perceived to be the same sound by a listener regardless of which mouth posture we are using. Compensatory articulation guides /r/ production. In the ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on February 23, 2015
  • Reflections on PSHA, Part 1

    Last time, I blogged about being a member of a state speech-language-hearing association. In that blog I mentioned my state association's upcoming annual convention. Today's post is about some of my experiences at the PSHA Convention. I'll write about the other presentations I attended in my next post. My time at the convention was split among ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on April 11, 2012
  • Book It, Pt. 24: A Quick Trip to Ireland and the Land of Illusions

    I have spent a fair amount of time here complaining about winter, so it's a good time to let you know that I LOVE St. Patrick's Day, mostly because to me it is the beginning of spring. Also, I am Darn Well Irish (the MacSweeneys, one of them being my grandfather, hail from County Cork, Ireland). This is sort of a weird holiday to target ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on March 12, 2012
  • Book It, Pt. 21: The Alphabet Comes to the Rescue

    Books continue to be my heroes in my school position, sometimes showing up to save me from ennui when I least expect it. I was recently doing a pull-over sort of session in the literacy center (the kindergarten class is nearby and my room is, well, not), and spied the colorful cover of Alphabet Rescue, by Audrey Wood and her son, Bruce. ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on January 30, 2012
  • More Fall Fun!

    I am happy to share some good news for those of you who have been following the Speech in the Schools Blog over the past year. Last October in a blog post I recommended a book called ''The Spooky House of Horror'' by Charles Fuge, Ian Craig and Ron Van der Meer. I felt horrible to discover that it was a collectors' item and now costs a ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on October 31, 2011
  • Foamy, Fuzzy, and Bumpy Books!

    A couple of blogs ago, I wrote about several new therapy techniques/strategies/programs that I was trying with my students this year. Now that it is nearly the end of the first marking period (Friday!), I think I've had enough time and experience trialing these programs to give you my opinion of each in this blog. One of the four new ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on October 26, 2011
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