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Showing page 1 of 4 (36 total posts)
  • Letter to a Friend

    Dear Friend,Thank you for trusting me and telling me about everything. I didn’t realize how difficult this fall has been for you. The problems you described are painfully familiar:•    Fundamental imbalances in the amount of tasks required within the time period allotted•    Insurmountable paperwork and documentation, ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on October 9, 2015
  • Advice on Giving Advice

    When the right advice is given at the appropriate time, it improves lives. When off-hand, unsolicited advice is given, it may be a source of frustration. The concept of advice is to guide another person in making a decision or completing an action. As Speech Language Pathologists, we are often expected to provide advice and demonstrate expertise. ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on October 2, 2015
  • Abandoning Ship

    What if a child just isn't making the progress you would like to see no matter what toys or activities you plan for. I hear that a lot from therapists: ''This child just stumps me'' and ''He just isn't progressing.'' I say ''time to abandon ship.'' In order for us to clean our slate and avoid becoming so frustrated that we actually do not ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on September 18, 2015
  • Winning the Job Lottery

    “What would you do if you won a million dollars?”A few years ago I was working with an entertaining group of fifth grade students who were practicing producing their speech sounds at the sentence and conversational level. We were taking turns answering social questions from a deck of cards. We turned over the card with the question, “What would ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on August 14, 2015
  • Involving Parents in Early Intervention

    At our agency, we firmly believe in working alongside the parent and family to address speech and language delays in young children. We provide speech and language services in homes, parks, and day cares if that is the normal routine location that the family participates in. It would be a rare occasion if we were to exclude the parent or have the ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on July 28, 2015
  • Demographic Meanings

    “My caseload is really diverse. About 25% of the students are African-American, 25% are Hispanic, 25% are Asian, and the rest are American.”One of my colleagues offered this description of her caseload at a social event attended by other clinicians and university faculty. Did you notice anything interesting about the above statement? Perhaps you ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on July 16, 2015
  • Question Parents Carefully

    There are many test tools on the market to use with young children. I think it is important to understand the information that each of these tools can yield and that testing should contain a play component, a parental report component, and a standardized testing component whenever possible. There are parent questionnaires and tools that rely ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on July 16, 2015
  • Administering Tests to Toddlers

    “Are you kidding?” I chuckled to myself at the thought of the title of this blog entry. In grad school, I actually thought that you evaluated a toddler's speech and language skills by breaking out a standardized testing tool and you administered the test and that was that. Well, that sounds fabulous, but let me tell you all of the things that ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on July 7, 2015
  • First Class Clinicians

    Last week I met a skilled clinician who had recently relocated, transitioning from running a private practice in an urban environment to working in a rural school district. After our conversation, she shared the following sentiment: “I was encouraged by your own strong feelings that school-based clinicians aren't second class therapists and ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on July 3, 2015
  • Speaking and Being Heard

    In the early days of my career, I apprenticed with a clinician who specialized in Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC). She was highly skilled and in tune with her clients, who used forms of AAC to communicate. One day, a young girl arrived for her therapy appointment. The girl wore ankle/foot orthotics on both legs and had a stilted ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on June 18, 2015
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