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Showing page 2 of 7 (61 total posts)
  • Degree of Professionalism

    I would like to award you an honorary degree in professionalism. You worked hard for this degree. You studied and learned every day of your career, gaining insight from daily clinical, family, and staff interactions. You have specialized skills specific to clinical practice that you acquired through hard work and dedication. As practitioners, we ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on March 22, 2016
  • Recovering From an Angry Email

    I received an unfriendly email message from a colleague. The message started nicely with kind words, but ended with criticism and complaints. I felt stung. The whole situation was a misunderstanding and I had not even caused the problem. “I’m innocent,” I wanted to proclaim. “It wasn’t my fault. We didn’t even know that there could be a problem.” ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on March 16, 2016
  • In Their Shoes

    By Dana Wetmore   This past week, our department hosted a communication disorders program from a university in Japan. All 12 students were freshmen studying speech-language pathology and audiology. The students and their two professors attended our lectures, observed our therapy sessions and participated in events we hosted for them ...
    Posted to The First Session: New SLP Experiences (Weblog) on March 9, 2016
  • Saying the A-Word

    As a young therapist I felt it was my duty my mission to mention autism the second I saw it. Over the years I think I have changed or evolved to another train of thought. Yes, early identification is important. And yes, parents deserve to know if we have concerns as a professional. The problem is, if I am the treating therapist and mention ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on March 1, 2016
  • Vocabulary Schemes

    I almost got in an argument with a five-year-old. We were working on describing skills and taking turns providing descriptors for familiar objects. We were looking at a picture of a car. I attempted to give him a clue. I whispered that a car needs a key. He shook his head, “no”. He said that a car didn’t need a key. I looked at him ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on January 25, 2016
  • Grad School Interview Tips for Future SLPs

    Do you know future Speech Language Pathologists who are applying to graduate school? Here are some tips to share with them about graduate school interviews.Many university programs use interviews to learn about a candidate’s experiences, interests, and personality. Think about the following types of questions: •    What interested ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on January 18, 2016
  • Thankfulness All Year

    Feeling thankful is recognizing the good things in one’s life, whether they are big things or little things. During clinical sessions, we can help students recognize the significance of everyday events, and the value of the people in their lives. As clinicians, we are role models for our students. We teach through our own values and behaviors. ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on November 27, 2015
  • 'Is the Teacher a Racist?'

    “Do you think that the teacher is a racist?”Does this question offend you? Does it depend on the context? Does the context matter?Here is the actual situation: the special education team is reviewing referrals from general education staff. One teacher (not present) has referred a fourth grade student for concerns about his reading and math ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on November 20, 2015
  • Graduate School Applications

    Do you know anyone applying to graduate school? Here are some tips to share:Writer’s block: Fight the freeze by starting in the middle of the essay. Sometimes we discover introductions through conclusions. Return to the opening lines only after you’ve reached the end.Answer simple questions: Unsure what to say? Start with everyday, plain language. ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on November 16, 2015
  • Keep Calm and Stay Optimistic

    As speech-Language professionals many of us face struggles every day as we meet and work with those new and challenging clients.  Whether it’s finding and practicing new therapy strategies to help our clients reach their target goals or identifying additional needs as they arise.  We all face them and most of us every day.  What ...
    Posted to The Voice of the SLP Assistant (Weblog) on October 28, 2015
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