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  • Kicked Out of Preschool & Day Care?

    I’m not sure when and why this started happening, but these days it seems to be happening more often than ever, that is, toddlers being kicked out of preschools and day care. My mother was a day care provider, so I can really understand that sometimes children can be ultra-challenging and maybe the day care does not have the training to address ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on October 25, 2016
  • Observing the Complexity of Fun

    We know that we make positive changes in the lives of our clients, but our work can also make a meaningful difference to the next generation of speech-language pathologists. Many years ago, when I was learning to be a clinician, I observed Dr. Bob, a speech-language pathologist in private practice. Dr. Bob specialized in working with children ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on September 6, 2016
  • A Harsh Lesson in Access to Care

    Every once in a while you meet a family and are forever changed. That is how I am feeling right now.  I called a mother to coordinate a Spanish-speaking speech evaluation in the family's home in San Francisco. Mother indicated over the phone that she worked five days a week, sometimes more, and her hours varied, but she could never be home ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on September 1, 2016
  • Are You Ready to Order?

    A good waitress communicates, well, tells you the specials and maybe how long something will take to make. A good waitress knows her customer so well that they can remember what kinds of foods you like and maybe recommend something else around your taste buds. She remembers your name and asks how you've been and demonstrates a genuine ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on July 11, 2016
  • Articulation: Social Belonging and Safety

    How do you decide if a child needs articulation therapy? My colleague and I discussed different factors.Does it sound like the child has an accent?A mother shared with me that everyone thinks they’re from another part of the country.Their son’s articulation disorder sounds like an accent. Whenever they meet people who have met their son first, ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on May 17, 2016
  • Hearing Two Phonemes

    A child who is substituting /w/ for /r/ makes progress producing /r/. He is now using /r/ in initial position in words. Surprisingly, he is also now substituting /r/ for /w/. He is producing “right” correctly, but now he is no longer saying “white”. My colleague shared this story with me and explained how she needed to provide specific ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on April 5, 2016
  • Recovering From an Angry Email

    I received an unfriendly email message from a colleague. The message started nicely with kind words, but ended with criticism and complaints. I felt stung. The whole situation was a misunderstanding and I had not even caused the problem. “I’m innocent,” I wanted to proclaim. “It wasn’t my fault. We didn’t even know that there could be a problem.” ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on March 16, 2016
  • Saying the A-Word

    As a young therapist I felt it was my duty my mission to mention autism the second I saw it. Over the years I think I have changed or evolved to another train of thought. Yes, early identification is important. And yes, parents deserve to know if we have concerns as a professional. The problem is, if I am the treating therapist and mention ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on March 1, 2016
  • Thankfulness All Year

    Feeling thankful is recognizing the good things in one’s life, whether they are big things or little things. During clinical sessions, we can help students recognize the significance of everyday events, and the value of the people in their lives. As clinicians, we are role models for our students. We teach through our own values and behaviors. ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on November 27, 2015
  • 'Is the Teacher a Racist?'

    “Do you think that the teacher is a racist?”Does this question offend you? Does it depend on the context? Does the context matter?Here is the actual situation: the special education team is reviewing referrals from general education staff. One teacher (not present) has referred a fourth grade student for concerns about his reading and math ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on November 20, 2015
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