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Showing page 2 of 2 (19 total posts)
  • Measuring Trust

    There's often a single moment in therapy when you recognize that the client now sees you as a trusted support. As clinicians, we measure clients' progress in skill development in many ways, including daily data collection, judgments of approximations, tallies and percentages of correct responses, levels of scaffolding and modeling, audio/video ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on September 18, 2015
  • Demographic Meanings

    “My caseload is really diverse. About 25% of the students are African-American, 25% are Hispanic, 25% are Asian, and the rest are American.”One of my colleagues offered this description of her caseload at a social event attended by other clinicians and university faculty. Did you notice anything interesting about the above statement? Perhaps you ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on July 16, 2015
  • Terminology and the Power of Plain Language

    Speech language pathologists use an impressive amount of technical terminology, also known as jargon. This is to be expected within any professional discipline, however, clinicians are regularly required to code-switch between high-level terminology and plain language.Back in my early days, I was presenting to a teacher and a young ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on April 3, 2015
  • Verb Choices and Learning Opportunities

    Our daily lives are filled with a combination of both obligations and opportunities. Sometimes we may even have difficulty distinguishing between the two. Having the chance to work hard, to push oneself to accomplish tasks, and to learn new things is an opportunity. Access to education is not universal – learning is in many ways still a ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on March 27, 2015
  • Advocates for Acceptance

    In our practice we recognize differing communication and learning abilities. As clinicians, we work to increase our clients’ access to social opportunities and interactions. We understand that all people have a unique way of expressing their thoughts and ideas. Within the nature of the human condition, skills vary across domains, and ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on March 13, 2015
  • White/Gold vs. Blue/Black Dress

    Millions of people on social media and later mainstream media recently viewed a photo of a particular dress that stirred a national debate. Due to the background lighting and photographic exposure, people saw the two colors of the dress differently. For all of us who debated the colors of that dress (blue/black or white/gold), we had a ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on March 4, 2015
  • Alex’s Favorite Things 2011

    Last year I wrote a post, a la Oprah, about my favorite (speech therapy) things! Since it is that time of year again, I am going to discuss one favorite, recycled item! In the clinic I do some work for over the summer, there is an amazing long, transparent tube. I cannot tell you how much I have coveted this tube and wanted to take it ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on December 26, 2011
  • Foamy, Fuzzy, and Bumpy Books!

    A couple of blogs ago, I wrote about several new therapy techniques/strategies/programs that I was trying with my students this year. Now that it is nearly the end of the first marking period (Friday!), I think I've had enough time and experience trialing these programs to give you my opinion of each in this blog. One of the four new ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on October 26, 2011
  • This Conference Was a Winner!

    I typically don't use my blog to ''advertise'' a particular therapy approach or a speaker. I am completely in favor of the ''eclectic'' approach to speech-language therapy. I take bits and pieces from a variety of therapy interventions/approaches/strategies and use what works best with my individual students. However, I'm always open to new ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on October 12, 2011