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  • Starting in a New School

    Are you new to a school building this year? There are, of course, the obvious tasks:•    Make friends with the secretaries and custodial staff•    Connect with administration and share how happy you are to be at the school•    Complete a monthly calendar for annual IEP and re-evaluation due ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on August 29, 2016
  • Saying the A-Word

    As a young therapist I felt it was my duty my mission to mention autism the second I saw it. Over the years I think I have changed or evolved to another train of thought. Yes, early identification is important. And yes, parents deserve to know if we have concerns as a professional. The problem is, if I am the treating therapist and mention ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on March 1, 2016
  • We Do Care

    A few years ago, I attended a restorative listening community event, which brought together parents/caregivers, general education teachers, special education service providers, and administrators. I wasn’t sure what to expect as I entered a large hall filled with round tables. Seating was organized so that each table contained members of the ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on February 29, 2016
  • Question Parents Carefully

    There are many test tools on the market to use with young children. I think it is important to understand the information that each of these tools can yield and that testing should contain a play component, a parental report component, and a standardized testing component whenever possible. There are parent questionnaires and tools that rely ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on July 16, 2015
  • SLP Overcomes Stroke to Help Others with Dysphagia

    Personal experience has helped make Heather Storie, SLP, a speech-language pathologist at Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Fort Worth, passionate about helping patients with something most people take for granted – the ability to eat. Storie began her career at Texas Health Fort Worth as a speech-language pathologist in 2008. She has spent ...
    Posted to Speech and Hearing Perspectives (Weblog) on May 13, 2015
  • Your Child’s Biggest Fan

    Somewhere along the line you have heard the word ''autism.'' Tomorrow is the day someone will either confirm your deepest fears or at the very least tell you this might be going on with your child. I want you to remember this — no diagnosis or label will ever change the love you have for your child. It should never shatter the dreams ...
    Posted to The Ins and Outs of Early Intervention (Weblog) on March 18, 2015
  • White/Gold vs. Blue/Black Dress

    Millions of people on social media and later mainstream media recently viewed a photo of a particular dress that stirred a national debate. Due to the background lighting and photographic exposure, people saw the two colors of the dress differently. For all of us who debated the colors of that dress (blue/black or white/gold), we had a ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on March 4, 2015
  • ALS: Don't Wait to Evaluate

    One of the most challenging, heart breaking and rewarding assessments I complete as an SLP who evaluates those that need a communication device, is evaluating a person who has been recently diagnosed with ALS. ALS, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, is a progressive neurological disease that typically affects all muscles - but often the muscles for ...
    Posted to Speech Therapy: The ABCs of AAC (Weblog) on June 4, 2014
  • A Lack of Autism Training

    To date, my graduate student extern (referred to as ''student teacher'' from here on out for the sake of convenience) has been with me for two weeks now. I'm hoping she has learned a lot so far, as I know I have learned things from her already. Having a student teacher really has caused me to do some self-reflecting on my own therapy and ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on January 18, 2012
  • A True Story of Acceptance

    Last December I was assigned a new child to my caseload. She was already being seen by several of my co-workers who each informed me of their grave concerns regarding her development. At the time, she had not yet been diagnosed with anything other than a developmental delay; however two of my seasoned staff members confided that they were ...
    Posted to Early Intervention Speech Therapy (Weblog) on September 18, 2009
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