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  • Agents of Change

    Do you believe that your actions affect your life outcome? Do you believe that you can influence other people by what you say and do? Do you believe that you can be part of a group of people who bring about positive change in the world?   The ability to have power over our own actions and the actions of others is agency. You are an agent — ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on November 18, 2016
  • Questions for Upsetting Times

    I saw something upsetting this week. I wasn’t sure whether or not I should tell you about it, but I decided that we learn a lot not just from good things, but bad things too. It was a brief incident that highlighted greater concerns at the individual, local and national level.   From the clinic room, you could hear young voices swearing in ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on October 24, 2016
  • Our Time Matters

    Every day is a chance to make a positive difference in the lives of clients, families, and colleagues. Our daily activities are important and have immediate effects. When days are hectic, it becomes easy to feel rushed and overwhelmed. Reflecting on the primary motivation of our work can guide us. We can see how our time matters. Speech-language ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on October 10, 2016
  • Observing the Complexity of Fun

    We know that we make positive changes in the lives of our clients, but our work can also make a meaningful difference to the next generation of speech-language pathologists. Many years ago, when I was learning to be a clinician, I observed Dr. Bob, a speech-language pathologist in private practice. Dr. Bob specialized in working with children ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on September 6, 2016
  • Learning from Clinical Mistakes

    I hate making clinical mistakes. They make me feel bad about my skills and myself. Mistakes may often be based on lack of information, which affects the development of a relationship. Sometimes the desire to make a difference as quickly as possible negatively affects the collection of comprehensive background information and prolonged ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on August 8, 2016
  • Morality of Materials

    All of our treatment materials teach cultural values and morals. The words, photographs, drawings, games and activities represent what society perceives to be important. They imply ways to behave and belief systems.   My colleague and I were swapping stories about some of the outdated materials that we’ve found stored in the back of unused ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on July 26, 2016
  • Articulation: Social Belonging and Safety

    How do you decide if a child needs articulation therapy? My colleague and I discussed different factors.Does it sound like the child has an accent?A mother shared with me that everyone thinks they’re from another part of the country.Their son’s articulation disorder sounds like an accent. Whenever they meet people who have met their son first, ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on May 17, 2016
  • Benefits of Insecurity

    Confidence is widely regarded as an important trait for success, and insecurity is often considered a liability. Recently, a colleague who is transitioning to a new team shared her fears with me about her position change. She will soon be working alongside Occupational Therapists and Physical Therapists to serve children who use Augmentative and ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on April 12, 2016
  • Hearing Two Phonemes

    A child who is substituting /w/ for /r/ makes progress producing /r/. He is now using /r/ in initial position in words. Surprisingly, he is also now substituting /r/ for /w/. He is producing “right” correctly, but now he is no longer saying “white”. My colleague shared this story with me and explained how she needed to provide specific ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on April 5, 2016
  • Degree of Professionalism

    I would like to award you an honorary degree in professionalism. You worked hard for this degree. You studied and learned every day of your career, gaining insight from daily clinical, family, and staff interactions. You have specialized skills specific to clinical practice that you acquired through hard work and dedication. As practitioners, we ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on March 22, 2016
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