Close Server: KOPWWW05 | Not logged in


Welcome to Health Care POV | sign in | join
in Search

BROWSE BY TAGS

All Tags » vocabulary » parents   (RSS)
Showing page 1 of 4 (39 total posts)
  • Rainbow Fairies

    Fairies represent magic and wonder. The word “fairy” is a magic because it helps students transition from consonantal /r/ to vocalic /r/. The intervocalic /r/ in medial position allows us to produce /r/ at the end of the first syllable and the beginning of the second syllable, “fairrrr-- -rry”. We can teach the postvocalic /r/ through ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on June 29, 2016
  • Record It

    Cell phones and tablets allow for immediate audio and video recording. Students typically begin by making silly recordings of greetings and funny sayings. Since most of us are initially surprised at how our voice sounds on a recording, we watch British Radio 1 Scientist, Greg Foot’s YouTube video, “Why does your voice sound different on a ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on June 14, 2016
  • What Did You Learn This Year?

    Every school year we learn new things. I recently took a few minutes to ask each student the question, “What have you learned about your talking and your speaking this year?”Here are a few of the different responses:•    “I learned that I can do good R’s fairly consistently.”•    “I learned a different kind of R and ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on June 9, 2016
  • Steps of Communication

    Did you ever catch your friend’s eye from across the room at a crowded event and let her know that you were ready to leave? Briefly tilting your head to the side and a quick glance toward the door can represent an entire sentence.We exchange thoughts and ideas through gestures, facial expressions, body postures, and physical ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on April 29, 2016
  • Hearing Two Phonemes

    A child who is substituting /w/ for /r/ makes progress producing /r/. He is now using /r/ in initial position in words. Surprisingly, he is also now substituting /r/ for /w/. He is producing “right” correctly, but now he is no longer saying “white”. My colleague shared this story with me and explained how she needed to provide specific ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on April 5, 2016
  • Recovering From an Angry Email

    I received an unfriendly email message from a colleague. The message started nicely with kind words, but ended with criticism and complaints. I felt stung. The whole situation was a misunderstanding and I had not even caused the problem. “I’m innocent,” I wanted to proclaim. “It wasn’t my fault. We didn’t even know that there could be a problem.” ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on March 16, 2016
  • Naturalistic Repetition

    Clinicians typically rely heavily on the phrases “say it again” and the mind-numbing “one more time” in articulation therapy. Intervention for speech sound disorders generally includes repeated trials of target words to facilitate auditory discrimination of correct/incorrect productions, self-monitoring of accuracy, and the formation of a new ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on January 31, 2016
  • Calendars Make Time Visible

    “What day is it today?” I ask students this question at the beginning of every session. It started as strategy of modeling self-talk, showing students my thought processes as I recorded the session data in the data log. Thinking aloud highlights internal steps of planning and information seeking. With busy schedules, often across multiple sites, ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on December 18, 2015
  • Looking at Language Samples

    A colleague asked about ways to analyze a language sample:Consider cultural and linguistic factors: dialect/language differences, linguistic community, etc.Highlight conjunctions: compare compound and complex sentences•    Coordinating conjunctions: and, but, or, etc.•    Subordinating conjunctions: before/after, ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on December 7, 2015
  • Thankfulness All Year

    Feeling thankful is recognizing the good things in one’s life, whether they are big things or little things. During clinical sessions, we can help students recognize the significance of everyday events, and the value of the people in their lives. As clinicians, we are role models for our students. We teach through our own values and behaviors. ...
    Posted to Speech in the Schools (Weblog) on November 27, 2015
1 2 3 4 Next >