Welcome to Health Care POV | sign in | join
in Search

BROWSE BY TAGS

All Tags » workplace issue... » Patient Care » Professional Standards
Showing page 1 of 8 (72 total posts)
  • DNP Essential: Leadership 2.0

    The American Association of Colleges of Nursing published the ''The Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing'' in 2006. There are eight essentials outlining the required competencies of a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) graduate. The second essential pertains to leadership and emphasizes the DNP's ability to facilitate ...
    Posted to NP & PA Student Blog (Weblog) on July 29, 2014
  • NP's Orders

    There are not many things that frustrate me in my clinical practice. Most patients are open, receptive and leave shaking their heads in agreement to your plan of care. What happens once they leave your office is often unknown. You hope that they venture directly to the pharmacy, take their medications as prescribed and their health improves. ...
    Posted to First Year NP (Weblog) on July 28, 2014
  • How to Avoid Absolute Frustration

    Primary care is so imperfect. Each day I could probably find as many things to complain about as complaints my patients come in with, and I am beginning to see why burnout can occur. That is, if you don't have the right perspective. As I forge ahead on this year-one journey, I am creating tenets to avoid burnout. I'm honestly not a huge ...
    Posted to First Year PA (Weblog) on July 21, 2014
  • A Milestone in Protection from Influenza

    The following is a statement released June 17 by Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority Director and Deputy Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Robin Robinson, PhD.  This week, our nation reached a milestone in battling influenza, with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s first approval to manufacture ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Perspective: Nurses (Weblog) on June 17, 2014
  • What's Up, Doc?

    In our urgent care there are four full time providers: three physician assistants and myself. Our medical director, a physician, comes in one half shift per week. As we enter a patient's room, we always introduce ourselves by our title. ''Hi, I'm Katrin and I am a nurse practitioner.'' There is never any bait or switch and patients are aware ...
    Posted to First Year NP (Weblog) on January 17, 2014
  • Privacy and Confidentiality

    I don't know about you, but there isn't a day that goes by when I don't have some sort of umm....interesting experience at work. I understand how awfully tempting it is to jump on Facebook or Twitter and share the events of my day with all 100+ or so of my closest ''friends''. It's so very rewarding to watch a post collect ''likes'' and ...
    Posted to Career Coach (Weblog) on October 16, 2013
  • The Quarterly Check-Up: Part 3

    We have carved deep into the second half of my first year as a professional physician assistant. This is the perfect time for a Quarterly Check-Up to examine some of the biggest lessons over the last three months We learned that our patient's beliefs can trump the strongest medicine and that our acceptance of those beliefs makes us better ...
    Posted to First Year PA (Weblog) on October 3, 2013
  • The Lessons Never Taught

    I remember all of my great preceptors: The ones who reaffirmed my choice of career or mentored my special projects or were less of a taskmaster and more of a friend. As a student, I pictured myself in their position, guiding some wide-eyed student through the treacherous surf of clinical rotations. I imagined that sage, professorial Harrison ...
    Posted to First Year PA (Weblog) on September 19, 2013
  • Pet Therapy

    Occasionally after clinic, I will allow my red fox labrador retriever to assist me in chart completion and pathology management. I absolutely love having her nap under my desk and her presence brightens up our entire office.   I live in a very dog friendly community and the majority of my patients own a dog, which makes an easy ...
    Posted to Dermatology Practice Today (Weblog) on August 29, 2013
  • The Secret Ingredient

    People always want to know the secret ingredient. And, frankly, I can't blame them. In a lot of ways the physician assistant profession seems too good to be true. We study medicine for two to three years after obtaining a bachelor's degree. We practice medicine without post-graduate training or residency. We can switch specialties without ...
    Posted to First Year PA (Weblog) on August 8, 2013
1 2 3 4 5 Next > ... Last »