Close Server: KOPWWW05 | Not logged in


Welcome to Health Care POV | sign in | join
in Search

BROWSE BY TAGS

All Tags » workplace issue... » Personal Reflection   (RSS)
Showing page 1 of 4 (35 total posts)
  • Why We Dislike Labels

    We utilize descriptive terms nearly every day, whether during handoff or when reading through charts. ''An elderly, well-nourished, white male, appearing his stated age, was admitted for a complaint of increasing shortness of breath.'' Labels. Professionally, we may not think twice about their use, except for the harsh glare we give when we hear ...
    Posted to The Nurse Card (Weblog) on December 14, 2016
  • Mean Nurses, Where are Your Manners?

    Every day in our nursing career we meet a lot of diverse types of people. But handling different types of nurses at work can be a dismaying task. It can be very challenging working with lazy, difficult coworkers who don't pull their weight. If you have been in this profession for any length of time (22 years for me), you know who I am talking ...
  • MacGyver Nurses Among Us

    I cannot remember the first time I heard the term ''MacGyver Nurse.''  For those of you that do not remember watching MacGyver, the show is back. The main character could settle any crisis, it seemed, from world war, invasions of aliens, or out-of-control spaceships with duct tape, his Swiss pocket knife, and gum.  Okay, I ...
    Posted to On Call: Leadership in Nursing (Weblog) on November 17, 2016
  • An Exceptional Mantra for Nurses

    I'm not sure when exactly it starts, but I DO know that across the board nurses are very similar in one personality trait. We're universally hard on ourselves while being, inversely, very forgiving of others. We set our own bar unbelievably high. This unfortunate habit may kick in shortly after we articulate the Florence Nightingale pledge—when ...
    Posted to The Nurse Card (Weblog) on October 12, 2016
  • Small Talk Can be a Big Deal

    There are so many instances where small talk is practiced regularly in the various nursing units. Small talk is unescapable: in the elevator, in the lobby, in the café... everywhere. The real benefit to small talk isn't what's said; it's when relationships are built over time. If your shift starts at 0700, then chances are you are going to see ...
    Posted to RN Men: The XY Viewpoint (Weblog) on October 7, 2016
  • Forgive Others… You Deserve It

    In my previous post, I spoke about one of my learnings for helping the nursing profession grow more resilient and introduced the concept of forgiveness. I can tell you this is not an easy subject matter to discuss in the workplace or beyond. What I can also tell you is that the energy of being angry and judgmental wears on the individual, team and ...
    Posted to On Call: Leadership in Nursing (Weblog) on September 19, 2016
  • Nurse, Heal Thy Spiritual Self

    Last month, I shared with you a very personal story that jump-started my quest to further understand why nurses are emotionally tired. I wanted to understand how today's environment spiritually impacts the practice of nursing. I dove into the research and literature like they were a cool pond on a hot August day. I researched with gusto, hungry ...
    Posted to On Call: Leadership in Nursing (Weblog) on August 19, 2016
  • The Bitter Team

    Every place I ever worked as a nurse/manager, there is always someone on staff that erodes morale, the employees who repeatedly slack off, talk back, or fail to complete tasks on time. Let's face it: we have all encountered this at some point in our career; the issue is how to handle this. When an employee starts to lose respect, your authority ...
  • Going Off Script

    By virtue of a chronic illness, I have a dual perspective on healthcare. As an occasional patient, I am able to more closely understand both the provider and the utilization side of care. As a result of my experience, I have learned that bedside communication can be enlightening, perhaps representing a barometer of how a particular institution may ...
    Posted to The Nurse Card (Weblog) on July 25, 2016
  • The Cost of Caring

    Suddenly there it was—a lack of compassion. Or was it? She was only 29-years-old when the phone rang with news no one wants to hear. She didn't believe it at first, and neither did her family. Then it became reality-more doctor appointments and finally surgery scheduled for a double mastectomy. She had ductal carcinoma, highly aggressive, but ...
    Posted to On Call: Leadership in Nursing (Weblog) on July 19, 2016
1 2 3 4 Next >