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  • The Bitter Team

    Every place I ever worked as a nurse/manager, there is always someone on staff that erodes morale, the employees who repeatedly slack off, talk back, or fail to complete tasks on time. Let's face it: we have all encountered this at some point in our career; the issue is how to handle this. When an employee starts to lose respect, your authority ...
  • Summer Madness, Vacation Challenge

    Summer is here! Living in New England, our summers tend to be short, but so is staffing.  For most of us, summer is a time of fun, relaxation and beach days. Many employees already have summer and vacation on their minds; after all, it's been a long winter and the staff is ready to get away from it all and get some much needed R&R. ...
  • Nurse First, Manager Second

    Being a nursing manager these days, people automatically assume means being dressed in a suit with a lab coat, rarely venturing out to patient care areas and a having a nice big office. The biggest complaint that I hear is that managers forget about being nurses and are not clinically involved and lack clinical credibility. Reality check. I ...
  • Men in Nursing: A Diversity Solution

    By Sam Osei, RN In my opinion, I do not think the body of nursing has done enough to acknowledge the presence of males in the nursing profession in this 21st century. Low interest in nursing for men contributes to the lack of gender diversity in the profession. As a result, stereotype of nursing as a “female profession” persists. Men make ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Perspective: Nurses (Weblog) on November 10, 2014
  • Why Are New Nurses Leaving?

    One in five. That's how many new nurses choose to change their job within their first year of nursing. One in three leave within two years. Given that new grads often struggle to find their first positions, one study shines a light on this interesting trend -- and why it might not be a bad thing. These statistics were based on a study in the ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Perspective: Nurses (Weblog) on September 29, 2014
  • Nurse Turnover

    Nurse turnover is a complex phenomenon that directly affects patient outcomes and healthcare costs. When new graduate nurses accept new positions on or before one year of hire, the institution loses a significant amount of money that they invested in their training. This affects the bottom line (which equates to nurse-patient ratios), ...
    Posted to Guarding the Nursing Profession (Weblog) on September 29, 2014
  • ANA Lauds Registered Nurse Safe Staffing Bill Introduced In Senate

    The American Nurses Association (ANA) collectively applauds the introduction of federal legislation in the U.S. Senate that empowers registered nurses (RNs) to drive staffing decisions in hospitals, protect patients and improve the quality of care. The Registered Nurse Safe Staffing Act of 2014 (S. 2353), crafted with input from ANA, is ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Perspective: Nurses (Weblog) on May 19, 2014
  • Nurses Can't Seem to Escape Being Honest & Trustworthy

    As most everyone knows by now, nurses have for several years been ranked the ''Most Trusted Profession'' in an annual Gallup survey of Americans. But now a new study reveals nurses are also very good at assessing the quality of care delivered in the hospital units in which they work.  In short, it turns out nurses are not only trustworthy ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Perspective: Nurses (Weblog) on October 9, 2012
  • Obesity in Nursing

    Twelve-hour shifts have gotten some bad press. They've been linked to medical errors, nurse burnout and, now, higher rates of obesity in nurses. Researchers from the University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore, surveyed 2,103 female nurses and revealed nurses with long work hours were significantly more likely to be obese compared with ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Perspective: Nurses (Weblog) on January 30, 2012
  • CNAs as School Nurses: A Good Idea?

    As students in Salisbury, MD, head back to the days of homework and bus rides, the Wicomico County school district has decided to replace three registered nurses with certified nursing assistants, leaving some schools without an RN to care for children with medical needs that can't be handled by a CNA. ''We've had to be very strategic with ...
    Posted to ADVANCE Perspective: Nurses (Weblog) on August 31, 2011
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